EUROPAM

European Public Accountability Mechanisms

Slovenia

Country score (European Average*)
  • 77(66) Political Financing
  • 87(50) Financial Disclosure
  • 82(40) Conflict of Interest
  • 87(56) Freedom of Information
  • 65(65) Public Procurement

Country Facts

IncomeHigh
GNI per capita (2011 PPP $)28370.76
Population, total2064845.00
Urban population (% of total)49.63
Internet users (per 100 people)75.50
Life expectancy at birth (years)81.08
Mean years of schooling (years)12.1
Global Competitiveness Index4.5
Sources: World Bank, UNDP, WEF.

Political Financing

The Elections and Referenda Campaign Act  (1994 as amended 2013) and the Political Parties Act (2007, amended 2013) have been superseded by the Political Parties Act (2013) ZPoIS-E and the Elections and Referenda Campaign Act (2013) ZVRK-B, bringing changes to the law.

There are some restrictions on the income of political parties. Donations from foreign entities and anonymous donors are banned, as well as donations from corporations. Trade unions are permitted to donate. There are limits on donations to parties both during and outside of election periods.

Public funding is available for parties and is allocated based on the share of votes attained in the previous election. There are specific rules regarding subsidized access for the media which is allocated equally.

For regulation on spending, there is a ban on vote buying but not on state resources being used in favour or against a political party or candidate. There are limits on spending.

Parties are required to report on their finances annually and the reports are required to be made public. Reports must reveal financial information in relation to election campaigns and must reveal the identity of donors, if the contributions of natural persons exceed the average gross monthly salary. Reports are overseen by the Court of Auditors of the Republic of Slovenia. There are sanctions in the form of fines and loss of public funding for those breaching the provisions of the law.


Quantitative Data

Primary Metric

2012201520162017Trend
Bans and limits on private income69696969
Public funding75626262
Regulations on spending100757575
Reporting, oversight and sanctions100100100100

Values lie in range between 0 and 100, higher values implying higher legislation comprehensiveness


Qualitative Data

We are frequently reviewing and refining our data, so in case you notice any mistake in our assessment, feel free to send us an email by clicking the button ()

Bans and limits on private income

Bans on donations from foreign interests

Is there a ban on donations from foreign interests to political parties? Yes. It is prohibited for a Party to acquire funds from contributions of foreign private citizens, legal entities and natural persons, or from Party's property incomings from abroad, from bequests and gifts from abroad, or to acquire any funds or perform any services for a Party from abroad.‌ (Article 21 Political Parties Act (ZPoIS), 1994, amended 2014)
Is there a ban on donations from foreign interests to candidates? Yes. It is prohibited for a Party to acquire funds from contributions of foreign private citizens, legal entities and natural persons, or from Party's property incomings from abroad, from bequests and gifts from abroad, or to acquire any funds or perform any services for a Party from abroad.‌ (Article 21 Political Parties Act (ZPoIS), 1994, amended 2014)

Bans on corporate donations

Is there a ban on corporate donations to political parties? Yes. State bodies, local authorities, legal persons of public and private law and sole proprietors and individuals who engaged in an activity should not fund the election campaign, unless the law provides otherwise. Legal entities of private law, aimed at the creation of non-profit, can contribute contributions for the referendum campaign (Article 14 (5) Elections and Referenda Campaign Act (ZVRK), 2007, amended 2013)
Is there a ban on corporate donations to candidates? Yes. State bodies, local authorities, legal persons of public and private law and sole proprietors and individuals who engaged in an activity should not fund the election campaign, unless the law provides otherwise. Legal entities of private law, aimed at the creation of non-profit, can contribute contributions for the referendum campaign (Article 14 (5) Elections and Referenda Campaign Act (ZVRK), 2007, amended 2013)
Is there a ban on donations from corporations with government contracts to political parties? Yes. State bodies, local authorities, legal persons of public and private law and sole proprietors and individuals who engaged in an activity should not fund the election campaign, unless the law provides otherwise. Legal entities of private law, aimed at the creation of non-profit, can contribute contributions for the referendum campaign (Article 14 (5) Elections and Referenda Campaign Act (ZVRK), 2007, amended 2013)
Is there a ban on donations from corporations of partial government ownership to political parties? Yes. State bodies, local authorities, legal persons of public and private law and sole proprietors and individuals who engaged in an activity should not fund the election campaign, unless the law provides otherwise. Legal entities of private law, aimed at the creation of non-profit, can contribute contributions for the referendum campaign (Article 14 (5) Elections and Referenda Campaign Act (ZVRK), 2007, amended 2013)
Is there a ban on donations from corporations with government contracts to candidates? No. Absent from legal framework
Is there a ban on donations from corporations of partial government ownership to candidates? No. Absent from legal framework

Bans on donations from trade unions

Is there a ban on donations from Trade Unions to political parties? No. Absent from legal framework
Is there a ban on donations from Trade Unions to candidates? No. Absent from legal framework

Bans on anonymous donations

Is there a ban on anonymous donations to political parties? Yes. In contributing the contribution of the parties must be natural persons in addition to the amount of a given amount of the party to ensure the legality financial business Parties under this Act shall also communicate details of its name, surname, date of birth and address (Art 22 Political Parties Act (ZPoIS), 1994, amended 2014)
Is there a ban on anonymous donations to candidates? Yes. In contributing the contribution of the parties must be natural persons in addition to the amount of a given amount of the party to ensure the legality financial business Parties under this Act shall also communicate details of its name, surname, date of birth and address (Art 22 Political Parties Act (ZPoIS), 1994, amended 2014)

Other bans on donations

Is there a ban on state resources being given to or received by political parties or candidates (excluding regulated public funding)? No. Absent from legal framework
Is there a ban on any other form of donation? Yes. Legal entities of private law, aimed at the creation of non-profit, can contribute contributions for the referendum campaign (Art 14(5) Elections and Referenda Campaign Act (ZVRK), 2007, amended 2013)

Donation limits

Is there a limit on the amount a donor can contribute to a political party over a time period (not election specific)? Yes. Contributions to individual natural persons referred to in this article may not be in total in the year for which the annual work report of parties, exceed ten times the average gross monthly wage per worker in the Republic of Slovenia by the Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia for the previous year. (Art 22 Political Parties Act (ZPoIS), 1994, amended 2014)
Is there a limit on the amount a donor can contribute to a political party in relation to an election? Yes. Contributions to individual natural persons in total for each of the electoral campaign should not exceed ten average gross monthly wage per worker in the Republic of Slovenia by the Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia for the previous year (Art 14 Elections and Referenda Campaign Act (ZVRK), 2007, amended 2013)
Is there a limit on the amount a donor can contribute to a candidate? Yes. Same as for political Parties. 10 times the previous year’s average monthly wage (Art 14 Elections and Referenda Campaign Act (ZVRK), 2007, amended 2013)

Public funding 

Eligibility criteria for direct public funding to political parties

Eligibility criteria for direct public funding to political parties: Share of votes in previous election Yes. Parties who are in the last elections to the National Assembly a candidate of their candidate or candidates have a right to funding from the state Budget if they are in the country receive at least 1% of votes voters. (Art 23 Political Parties Act (ZPoIS), 1994, amended 2014)
Eligibility criteria for direct public funding to political parties: Representation in elected body No. Absent from legal framework
Eligibility criteria for direct public funding to political parties: Participation in election No. Absent from legal framework
Eligibility criteria for direct public funding to political parties: Number of candidates No. Absent from legal framework
Eligibility criteria for direct public funding to political parties: Share of seats in previous election No. Absent from legal framework
Eligibility criteria for direct public funding to political parties: Share of votes in next election No. Absent from legal framework
Eligibility criteria for direct public funding to political parties: Registration as a political party No. Absent from legal framework
Eligibility criteria for direct public funding to political parties: Share of seats in next election No. Absent from legal framework
Eligibility criteria for direct public funding to political parties: Number of members No. Absent from legal framework
Eligibility criteria for direct public funding to political parties: Other No. Absent from legal framework

Allocation calculations for direct public funding to political parties

Allocation calculations for direct public funding to political parties: Proportional to votes received Yes. 25% equally, 75% proportionally by votes won in all constituencies. Parties in the first and second paragraphs of this Article shall be entitled to 25% of the funds earmarked in the budget for funding of political parties, in equal shares to the remaining 75% of funds were justified in proportion to the number of votes of the voters who have received in all constituencies. Parties who have submitted a joint candidate list, sharing the assets acquired on the basis of proportional sharing, in accordance with the mutual agreement if no agreement has been concluded, but the same proportions. (Art 23 Political Parties Act (ZPoIS), 1994, amended 2014)
Allocation calculations for direct public funding to political parties: Equal No. Absent from legal framework
Allocation calculations for direct public funding to political parties: Proportional to seats received No. Absent from legal framework
Allocation calculations for direct public funding to political parties: Flat rate by votes received No. Absent from legal framework
Allocation calculations for direct public funding to political parties: Share of expenses reimbursed No. Absent from legal framework
Allocation calculations for direct public funding to political parties: Proportional to candidates fielded No. Absent from legal framework
Allocation calculations for direct public funding to political parties: Number of members No. Absent from legal framework
Allocation calculations for direct public funding to political parties: Other No. Absent from legal framework

Earmarking provisions for direct public funding to political parties

Earmarking provisions for direct public funding to political parties: Campaign spending No. Absent from legal framework
Earmarking provisions for direct public funding to political parties: Ongoing party activities No. Absent from legal framework
Earmarking provisions for direct public funding to political parties: Intra-party institution No. Absent from legal framework
Earmarking provisions for direct public funding to political parties: Other No. Absent from legal framework

Allocation criteria for free or subsidized access to media for political parties

Allocation criteria for free or subsidized access to media for political parties: Equal Yes. Issuers of other print and electronic media in a direct or indirect majority public ownership should ensure that all organizers of a level playing field for the publication of election propaganda messages with the rules laid down in the first paragraph, they must ensure equality of the organizers of the election campaign in the presentation of candidates and their programs in which may be made for specific terms or the space for political parties that are already represented in the National Assembly or for political parties and candidate lists that are already represented in representative bodies of local communities, and specific dates or room for political parties and candidate lists not yet represented in the National Assembly or the representative organs of local communities (Art 6 (3) Elections and Referenda Campaign Act (ZVRK), 2007, amended 2013)
Allocation criteria for free or subsidized access to media for political parties: Number of candidates No. Absent from legal framework
Allocation criteria for free or subsidized access to media for political parties: Share of seats No. Absent from legal framework
Allocation criteria for free or subsidized access to media for political parties: Share of votes in preceding election No. Absent from legal framework ( )
Allocation criteria for free or subsidized access to media for political parties: Other No. Absent from legal framework
Are there provisions for free or subsidized access to media for candidates? Yes. Not later than within 45 days before the voting day at elections or 25 days before the voting day at referendum the public media must determine and publish the rules (scope, conditions and methods) for the use of broadcasting time and newspaper space for presentation of candidates, political parties and their programmes or presentation of opinions on the referendum question.‌ (2) During the elections campaign, Radiotelevizija Slovenija shall provide broadcasting time for presentation of candidates or opinions on the referendum question in compliance with the provisions of the act regulating Radiotelevizija Slovenija on political campaign in the programmes of Radiotelevizija Slovenija.‌ (Election and Referendum Campaign Act (Article 6 (1) Elections and Referenda Campaign Act (ZVRK), 2007, amended 2013)

Are there provisions for any other form of indirect public funding?

Provisions for any other form of indirect public funding: Premises for campaign meetings No. Absent from legal framework
Provisions for any other form of indirect public funding: Space for campaign materials Yes. Local government bodies shall provide all campaigns with free advertising space (without charging tax). (1) Sticking and posting posters containing elections campaign communications for the elections campaign (hereinafter referred to as posters) shall be allowed on poster locations determined by the local community.‌ The local community shall provide to all organizers of elections campaign free of cost and without the payment of municipal tax, equality in sticking and posting of posters at all poster locations whose number and total area shall allow to a particular elections campaign organizer at least the basic informing of the voters in the local community on the list of candidates or candidate or on the referendum question.‌ (2) The local community may also determine additional poster locations, but these shall be available to elections campaign organizers solely under certain conditions and against payment.‌ (3) Sixty days before the voting day at elections at the latest or 25 days before the voting day at referendum at the latest the local community must give public notice of the conditions for acquisition of the right to use the poster locations referred to in the two preceding paragraphs of this Article.‌ (4) The local community public utility service shall be responsible for removing the posters posted in conflict with the provisions of this Article and shall remove such posters at the expense of the organizer of the elections campaign.‌ (Election and Referendum Campaign Act (Article 8 Elections and Referenda Campaign Act (ZVRK), 2007, amended 2013)
Provisions for any other form of indirect public funding: Tax relief No. Absent from legal framework
Provisions for any other form of indirect public funding: Free or subsidised transport No. Absent from legal framework
Provisions for any other form of indirect public funding: Free or subsidised postage cost No. Absent from legal framework
Provisions for any other form of indirect public funding: Other No. Absent from legal framework
Is the provision of direct public funding to political parties related to gender equality among candidates? No. Absent from legal framework
Are there provisions for other financial advantages to encourage gender equality in political parties? No. Absent from legal framework

Regulations on spending 

Is there a ban on vote buying? Yes. Anyone who by force, serious threat, bribery, deception, or other unfair method of coercion or influence, in order for the election or vote to vote or not to vote or not to vote in force or to vote for or against a proposal shall be punished by a fine or imprisonment up to one year. (Art 151 Criminal code 2008. amended 2016)
Are there bans on state resources being used in favour or against a political party or candidate? No. Absent from legal framework
Are there limits on the amount a political party can spend? Yes. Limit is based on the number of eligible voters; exact limit depends on the type of election. (1) The costs of elections campaign for elections into the National Assembly shall not exceed EUR 0.‌40 per eligible voter in the electoral district or in the electoral unit, where the list of candidates has been deposited or where an individual stands as a candidate.‌ (2) The costs of the elections campaign for elections to the European Parliament shall not exceed EUR 0.‌40 per eligible voter in the country.‌ (3) The costs of the elections campaign for elections of the President of the Republic shall not exceed EUR 0.‌25 per eligible voter in the country.‌ In case of repeated voting the expenses of elections campaign for the persons standing as candidates in that voting may be increased by further EUR 0.‌15 per eligible voter in the country.‌ (4) The costs of the elections campaign for elections into the representative body of the local community shall not exceed EUR 0.‌40 per eligible voter in the local community.‌ (5) The costs of the elections campaign for elections of the individually elected body of the local community shall not exceed EUR 0.‌25 per eligible voter in the local community.‌ In case of repeated voting the expenses of elections campaign for the persons standing as candidates in that voting may be increased by further EUR 0.‌15 per eligible voter in the local community.‌ (6) The costs of referendum campaign at the national level or at the local community level shall not exceed EUR 0.‌25 per eligible voter in the country or the local community.‌ (Election and Referendum Campaign Act (Article 23 Elections and Referenda Campaign Act (ZVRK), 2007, amended 2013))
Are there limits on the amount a candidate can spend? Yes. Same limit as for political parties. Depends on the type of election. (1) The costs of elections campaign for elections into the National Assembly shall not exceed EUR 0.‌40 per eligible voter in the electoral district or in the electoral unit, where the list of candidates has been deposited or where an individual stands as a candidate.‌ (2) The costs of the elections campaign for elections to the European Parliament shall not exceed EUR 0.‌40 per eligible voter in the country.‌ (3) The costs of the elections campaign for elections of the President of the Republic shall not exceed EUR 0.‌25 per eligible voter in the country.‌ In case of repeated voting the expenses of elections campaign for the persons standing as candidates in that voting may be increased by further EUR 0.‌15 per eligible voter in the country.‌ (4) The costs of the elections campaign for elections into the representative body of the local community shall not exceed EUR 0.‌40 per eligible voter in the local community.‌ (5) The costs of the elections campaign for elections of the individually elected body of the local community shall not exceed EUR 0.‌25 per eligible voter in the local community.‌ In case of repeated voting the expenses of elections campaign for the persons standing as candidates in that voting may be increased by further EUR 0.‌15 per eligible voter in the local community.‌ (6) The costs of referendum campaign at the national level or at the local community level shall not exceed EUR 0.‌25 per eligible voter in the country or the local community.‌ (Election and Referendum Campaign Act (Article 23 Elections and Referenda Campaign Act (ZVRK), 2007, amended 2013))

Reporting, oversight and sanctions 

Reporting standards

Do political parties have to report regularly on their finances? Yes. The party has for the past business year to produce an annual report in accordance with this Act and the accounting regulations and standards. The annual report for the previous financial year corresponds to the calendar year, the party to 31 March of the current year, in the case of status changes or termination within two months after the status change or termination, for the purpose of publication and national statistics to the Agency of the Republic of Slovenia Public Legal records and Related Services via the AJPES web portal. (Art 24 Political Parties Act (ZPoIS), 1994, amended 2014)
Do political parties have to report on their finances in relation to election campaigns? Yes. The organizer of the election campaign for elections to the National Assembly, the European Parliament, the President of the Republic or by referendum at national level must ensure transparency, legality of performance and effectiveness of supervision of the election campaign later than 15 days after the closure of the Special Transaction accounts report on the financing of election campaigns submitted to the Agency of the Republic of Slovenia for Public Legal Records and Related Services via the AJPES web portal. (Art 18 Elections and Referenda Campaign Act (ZVRK), 2007, amended 2013)
Do candidates have to report on their campaign finances? Yes. The organizer of the election campaign for elections to the National Assembly, the European Parliament, the President of the Republic or by referendum at national level must ensure transparency, legality of performance and effectiveness of supervision of the election campaign later than 15 days after the closure of the Special Transaction accounts report on the financing of election campaigns submitted to the Agency of the Republic of Slovenia for Public Legal Records and Related Services via the AJPES web portal. (Art 18 Elections and Referenda Campaign Act (ZVRK), 2007, amended 2013)
Is information in reports from political parties and/​or candidates to be made public? Yes. AJPES makes public the report of the 18 and 19 of this Act (about a report on the financing of election campaigns). (Art 21 Elections and Referenda Campaign Act (ZVRK), 2007, amended 2013 )
Must reports from political parties and/​or candidates reveal the identity of donors? Yes. If the contributions of natural persons referred to in this Article, the total amount in the year for which the annual work report of parties, exceed the average gross monthly salary must be made in the annual report gives information on the party's personal name and address of a natural person and the amount of the total annual amount which a natural person contributing parties. (Art 22Political Parties Act (ZPoIS), 1994, amended 2014)
Institutions receiving financial reports from political parties and/​or candidates
Institutions receiving financial reports from political parties and/​or candidates: Electoral Management Board No. Absent from legal framework
Institutions receiving financial reports from political parties and/​or candidates: Auditing agency Yes. The organizer of the election campaign for members of representative and individually elected bodies of local communities or local referendum Communities must, within 15 days after closing the transaction account submitted to the representative body of the local community and the Court of Auditors report all collected and used for election campaign. (Art 19 Elections and Referenda Campaign Act (ZVRK), 2007, amended 2013)
Institutions receiving financial reports from political parties and/​or candidates: Ministry No. Absent from legal framework ( )
Institutions receiving financial reports from political parties and/​or candidates: Special institution No. Absent from legal framework
Institutions receiving financial reports from political parties and/​or candidates: Court No. Absent from legal framework
Institutions receiving financial reports from political parties and/​or candidates: Other Yes. (Local Community) The organizer of the election campaign for members of representative and individually elected bodies of local communities or local referendum Communities must, within 15 days after closing the transaction account submitted to the representative body of the local community and the Court of Auditors report all collected and used for election campaign. (Art 19 Elections and Referenda Campaign Act (ZVRK), 2007, amended 2013)

Political finance oversight

Is it specified that a particular institution(s) is responsible for examining financial reports and/​or investigating violations?
Institution responsible for examining financial reports and/or investigating violations: Court No. Absent from legal framework
Institution responsible for examining financial reports and/or investigating violations: Ministry Yes. The supervision over the implementation of the provisions of this Act, where violations are defined by this Act and offenses carried out by the inspectorate responsible for Interior, with the exception of the implementation of the provisions of Articles 21, 22, first and second paragraphs of Article 24, 24a, 24b and the second paragraph of Article 25 of this Act, over which supervises Court of Auditors and the exercise of the provisions of paragraph 24 . hereof, above which supervises AJPES. (Art 27 Political Parties Act (ZPoIS), 1994, amended 2014)
Institution responsible for examining financial reports and/or investigating violations: Auditing agency Yes. The Court of Auditors of the Republic of Slovenia (hereinafter: ECA), on the basis of publicly available reports referred to in the third paragraph of the 24th of this Act shall examine whether the annual report drawn up in accordance with Article 24 of this Law. Political Parties Act (ZPoIS), 1994, amended 2014 Art 27: The supervision over the implementation of the provisions of this Act, where violations are defined by this Act and offenses carried out by the inspectorate responsible for Interior, with the exception of the implementation of the provisions of Articles 21, 22, first and second paragraphs of Article 24, 24a, 24b and the second paragraph of Article 25 of this Act, over which supervises Court of Auditors and the exercise of the provisions of paragraph 24 . hereof, above which supervises AJPES. The Court of Auditors supervises the limits of the powers provided for by this law and the law governing the jurisdiction of the Court. Inspection and other state authorities and holders of public powers, which in the execution of their tasks infringements of the provisions of the law in the first paragraph of this article must offenses body to submit a proposal for initiating criminal proceedings. (Art 24a Political Parties Act (ZPoIS), 1994, amended 2014.)
Institution responsible for examining financial reports and/or investigating violations: Electoral Management Body No. Absent from legal framework
Institution responsible for examining financial reports and/or investigating violations: Institution for this purpose No. Absent from legal framework
Institution responsible for examining financial reports and/or investigating violations: Other Yes. Inspection and other state authorities and holders of public powers, which in the execution of their tasks infringements of the provisions of the law in the first paragraph of this article must offenses body to submit a proposal for initiating criminal proceedings. (Art 27 Political Parties Act (ZPoIS), 1994, amended 2014)
Other institutions with a formal role in political finance oversight
Institutions with a formal role in political finance oversight: Court No. Absent from legal framework
Institutions with a formal role in political finance oversight: Ministry No. Absent from legal framework
Institutions with a formal role in political finance oversight: Auditing agency No. Absent from legal framework
Institutions with a formal role in political finance oversight: EMB No. Absent from legal framework
Institutions with a formal role in political finance oversight: Institution for this purpose No. Absent from legal framework
Institutions with a formal role in political finance oversight: Other Yes. The supervision over the implementation of the provisions of this Act, where violations are defined by this Act and offenses carried out by the inspectorate responsible for Interior, with the exception of the implementation of the provisions of Articles 21, 22, first and second paragraphs of Article 24, 24a, 24b and the second paragraph of Article 25 of this Act, over which supervises Court of Auditors and the exercise of the provisions of paragraph 24 . hereof, above which supervises AJPES. The Court of Auditors supervises the limits of the powers provided for by this law and the law governing the jurisdiction of the Court. Inspection and other state authorities and holders of public powers, which in the execution of their tasks infringements of the provisions of the law in the first paragraph of this article must offenses body to submit a proposal for initiating criminal proceedings. (Art 27 Political Parties Act (ZPoIS), 1994, amended 2014)
Sanctions for political finance infractions
Sanctions for political finance infractions: Fines Yes. A fine of 4,200 to 21,000 euros shall be imposed on any party: 1. that within 30 days after receiving a financial report on the operations of the party for the previous year fails to remit surplus revenue Parties for humanitarian purposes (fourth paragraph of Article 21); 2. The receiving funds, contributions or other proceeds from illicit sources and are not paid for humanitarian purposes within 30 days of receipt (seventh paragraph of Article 21 and Article 25 in conjunction with the ninth paragraph of Article 22); 3. The receiving cash contributions in excess of the amount determined under the law governing the tax procedure, concerning the obligations remittance payments and revenue per transaction accounts, or via the payment service provider has received contributions in cash higher than the amount that is determined on the basis of the law regulating tax procedure, concerning the obligations remittance payments and receipts on current accounts that are not paid by credit or payments direct debits charged to the payer's payment account, and an additional 30-day deadline set by the Court of Auditors determined the audit report the court is not paid for humanitarian purposes (first paragraph of Article 22 in conjunction with the sixth paragraph of Article 24b); 4. that a natural person who performs services for it or she sells the goods, does not conclude the corresponding contract in writing (third paragraph of Article 22); 5. The acquiring of the same individuals one year of contributions in the amount exceeding ten times the average gross monthly salary, and the excess shall be paid into the humanitarian purposes in an additional 30-day deadline set by the audit report determined by the Court of Auditors (fourth paragraph of Article 22 in conjunction with the sixth paragraph of Article 24b); 6. not obtain loans under the conditions laid down in the fifth paragraph of Article 22 of this Act; 7. that the annual report does not indicate the party data from the sixth and seventh paragraphs of Article 22 of this Act; 8 which fails to fulfill its obligations under the third paragraph of Article 24 and the second paragraph of Article 24a of this Act; 9. that, at the request of the Court not to or does not provide the explanations, information or documents that are necessary to perform the audit, or not allow access in their books and records (the second paragraph of Article 24b). A fine of EUR 450 to EUR 900 shall be imposed on the responsible person of the party who commits an offense referred to in the preceding paragraph (Art 28. Political Parties Act (ZPoIS), 1994, amended 2014)
Sanctions for political finance infractions: Loss of public funding Yes. The decision of the court on offense, where it is established that the party responsible for the violation of Articles 4, 5 or 8 of the first paragraph of Article 28 of this Law, the parties may also face loss of rights to resources from the state budget and the budgets of local communities for a period of one year. By decision of the court on offense, where it is established that the party is liable for the offense referred to in Articles 6, 7, 9 or 10 of the first paragraph of Article 28 of this Act, the party for a period of six months to halve the funding to which it is entitled from the state budget and the budgets of local communities. Temporary loss or temporary restrictions on the right to funding from the first and second paragraphs of this article comes from the following month after the final decision on the offense. (Art 24c Political Parties Act (ZPoIS), 1994, amended 2014)
Sanctions for political finance infractions: Penal/Criminal No. Absent from legal framework
Sanctions for political finance infractions: Forfeiture No. Absent from legal framework
Sanctions for political finance infractions: Deregistration of party No. Absent from legal framework
Sanctions for political finance infractions: Loss of elected office No. Absent from legal framework
Sanctions for political finance infractions: Suspension of political party No. Absent from legal framework
Sanctions for political finance infractions: Loss of nomination of candidate No. Absent from legal framework
Sanctions for political finance infractions: Loss of political rights No. Absent from legal framework
Sanctions for political finance infractions: Other No. Absent from legal framework

Qualitative data for 2017


Legislation

Political Parties Act (ZPoIS), 1994, amended 2014 (Slovenian)pdf
Elections and Referenda Campaign Act (ZVRK), 2007, amended 2013 (Slovenian)pdf
Criminal Code 2008, amended 2016 (Slovenian)pdf

Financial Disclosure

The Slovenian Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011) sets down the same financial disclosure requirements for all public officials. It specifies that declarations by the Head of State, Ministers, Members of Parliament, and Civil Servants must include real estate, movable assets, cash, debts, and gifts received in the framework of their function. Further, any taxable income, shares in or ownership of a private or public company, as well as any other public office or government contract held must be included. All other positions the public official holds must be declared, which would include board memberships. Family members are not included in the disclosure requirements.

Public officials submit their declarations upon taking and leaving office, and submit annual updates. Fines ranging from EUR 400 to 1,200 are stipulated for late filling, non-filling, or for making false disclosure statements. Financial disclosure of public officials is supervised by the Commission for the prevention of corruption. It functions as depository body, verifies submissions and their accuracy, and enforces sanctions in case of violations. It is responsible for all public officials. 


Quantitative Data

Primary Metric

2012201520162017Trend
Disclosure items57595959
Filing frequency75100100100
Sanctions100100100100
Monitoring and Oversight100100100100
Public access to declarations75757575

Alternative Metric

2012201520162017Trend
Head of State81878787
Ministers81878787
Members of Parliament82878787
Civil servants82878787

Values lie in range between 0 and 100, higher values implying higher legislation comprehensiveness


Qualitative Data

We are frequently reviewing and refining our data, so in case you notice any mistake in our assessment, feel free to send us an email by clicking the button ()

Head of State

Disclosure items

Spouses and children included in disclosure No. Absent from legal framework.
Income and Assets
Real estate Yes. Officials must declare information on immovable property with all the land register information on land plots. (Articles 41 and 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Movable assets Yes. Officials must declare movable property, the value of which exceeds EUR 10 000 (Articles 41 and 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Cash Yes. Officials must declare the total value of cash if it exceeds EUR 10 000 (Articles 41 and 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Loans and Debts Yes. Officials must declare debts, obligations or assumed guarantees and loans given, the value of which exceeds EUR 10 000 (Articles 41 and 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Income from outside employment/assets Yes. Officials must declare information on taxable income under the law governing personal income tax that is not exempt from personal incoem tax; monetary assets deposited in banks, savings banks and savings and loan undertakings, the total value of which in an individual account exceeds EUR 10 000; types and values of securities if, at the time of the declaration of assets, their total value exceeded EUR 10 000 and any other information in relation to assets that to the person with obligations wishes to provide. (Articles 41 and 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Incompatibilities
Gifts received as a public official Yes. Public officials must declare accepted gifts and their value in a list of gifts kept with the body or organisation where they hold office. If Gift value exceeds 75 Euros it becomes the property of the State. (Article 31 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011) )
Private firm ownership and/or stock holdings Yes. Officials must declare information on ownership or stakes, shares, management rights in a company, private institute or any other private activity with a description of the activity and a designation of the registered name or the name of the organization. (Articles 41 and 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Ownership of state-owned enterprises (SOEs) Yes. Officials must declare information on ownership or stakes, shares, management rights in a company, private institute or any other private activity with a description of the activity and a designation of the registered name or the name of the organization. (Articles 41 and 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Holding government contracts Yes. Officials must declare any other office held or activities performed (Articles 41 and 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Board member, advisor, or company officer of private firm Yes. Officials must declare any other office held or activities performed (Articles 26, 41, 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Post-employment No. Absent from legal framework.
Simultaneously holding policy-making position and policy-executing position Yes. Officials must declare any other office held or activities performed (Articles 41 and 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Participating in official decision-making processes that affect private interests Yes. Officials must declare any other office held or activities performed (Articles 41 and 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Concurrent employment of family members in public sector No. Absent from legal framework.

Filing frequency

Filing required upon taking office Yes. A professional officer, non-professional mayor and deputy mayor, an official at the state and of business person and citizen of the Republic of Slovenia, which performs the function of the institutions and other EU bodies and other international institutions to which he was appointed or elected on the basis of employment or the proposal of the Government of the Republic Slovenia and the National Assembly must immediately, no later than one month after entering and leaving the service or work to the Commission the details of their financial situation. Data on assets and income of these persons must also notify the Commission one year after leaving office or work. (Article 41 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Filing required upon leaving office Yes. A professional officer, non-professional mayor and deputy mayor, an official at the state and of business person and citizen of the Republic of Slovenia, which performs the function of the institutions and other EU bodies and other international institutions to which he was appointed or elected on the basis of employment or the proposal of the Government of the Republic Slovenia and the National Assembly must immediately, no later than one month after entering and leaving the service or work to the Commission the details of their financial situation. Data on assets and income of these persons must also notify the Commission one year after leaving office or work. (Article 41 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Filing required annually Yes. The persons responsible for procurement, the Commission information on their financial situation once a year, and up to 31 January each year for the preceding calendar year if, during the previous calendar year involved in the procurement procedure as defined in the 11th point 4 hereof. (Article 41 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Ad hoc filing required upon change in assets or conflicts of interest Yes. An official who perceives a conflict of interest, or the possibility of a conflict of interest, when assuming their job or office or during performing it, shall immediately inform their superior, or the Commission, in case of no superior. (Articles 38 and 43 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))

Sanctions

Sanctions stipulated for late filing (fines, administrative, and/or criminal) Yes. A fine of 400 to 1,200 euros shall be imposed upon a person who: in contravention of the provisions of paragraphs 2 and 3 of Article 41 of this act, fails to communicate information on his assets to the Commission; (Articles 77 (1) of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Sanctions stipulated for non-filing (fines, administrative, and/or criminal) Yes. A fine of 400 to 1,200 euros shall be imposed upon a person who: in contravention of the provisions of paragraphs 2 and 3 of Article 41 of this act, fails to communicate information on his assets to the Commission; (Articles 77 (1) of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Sanctions stipulated for false disclosure (fines, administrative, and/or criminal) Yes. A fine of between EUR 400 and 1200 shall be imposed on individual who acts in contravention of Articles 42 ansd 43 fails to provide the necessary data or provide false data. (Articles 77 (1) of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))

Monitoring and Oversight

Depository body explicitly identified Yes. The Commission for the prevention of corruption is the depository body. (Articles 26 (1), 35 (5), 38, 41(2), 43 (2), and 43 (2) of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Enforcement body explicitly identified Yes. The Commission for the prevention of corruption is the enforcement body or may refer the matter to all other competent authorities for enforcement (Articles 13, 39, 42 (3), 43, 44 and 45 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Some agency assigned responsibility for verifying submission Yes. The Commission may obtain any information from the official records to verify the accuracy of the statements of the with obligation to declare assets and if any inconsistencies of information found the Commission may request the person to enclose relevant evidence with the information specified. (Article 42 (2 and 3) of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Some agency assigned responsibility for verifying accuracy Yes. The Commission may obtain any information from the official records to verify the accuracy of the statements of the with obligation to declare assets and if any inconsistencies of information found the Commission may request the person to enclose relevant evidence with the information specified. (Article 42 (2 and 3) of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))

Public access to declarations

Public availability Yes. Data on the income and assets of the persons with obligations, with exception of persons responsible for public procurement and civil sevants of the National Review Commission, shall be publicly available in the part relating to income and assets obtained during the period of holding a public office or performing an activity and within one year after the termination of the office or activity, irrespective of the restrictions stipulated in the law governing the protection of personal information and the law governing the protection of confidential tax information. (Article 46 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Timing of information release specified Yes. Data shall be publicly available in the part relating to income and assets obtained during the period of holding a public office or performing an activity and within one year after the termination of the office or activityThe data shall be made publicly available for 24 months after the date of the termination of the office or work. A more detailed methodology for publishing the data shall be laid down by the Commission in its Rules of Procedure (Article 46 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Location(s) of access specified Yes. The data shall be published on the website of the Commission (Article 46 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Cost of access specified No. Absent from legal framework.

Ministers

Disclosure items

Spouses and children included in disclosure No. Absent from legal framework.
Income and Assets
Real estate Yes. Officials must declare information on immovable property with all the land register information on land plots. (Articles 41 and 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Movable assets Yes. Officials must declare movable property, the value of which exceeds EUR 10 000 (Articles 41 and 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Cash Yes. Officials must declare the total value of cash if it exceeds EUR 10 000 (Articles 41 and 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Loans and Debts Yes. Officials must declare debts, obligations or assumed guarantees and loans given, the value of which exceeds EUR 10 000 (Articles 41 and 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Income from outside employment/assets Yes. Officials must declare information on taxable income under the law governing personal income tax that is not exempt from personal incoem tax; monetary assets deposited in banks, savings banks and savings and loan undertakings, the total value of which in an individual account exceeds EUR 10 000; types and values of securities if, at the time of the declaration of assets, their total value exceeded EUR 10 000 and any other information in relation to assets that to the person with obligations wishes to provide. (Articles 41 and 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Incompatibilities
Gifts received as a public official Yes. Public officials must declare accepted gifts and their value in a list of gifts kept with the body or organisation where they hold office. If Gift value exceeds 75 Euros it becomes the property of the State. (Article 31 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011) )
Private firm ownership and/or stock holdings Yes. Officials must declare information on ownership or stakes, shares, management rights in a company, private institute or any other private activity with a description of the activity and a designation of the registered name or the name of the organization. (Articles 41 and 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Ownership of state-owned enterprises (SOEs) Yes. Officials must declare information on ownership or stakes, shares, management rights in a company, private institute or any other private activity with a description of the activity and a designation of the registered name or the name of the organization. (Articles 41 and 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Holding government contracts Yes. Officials must declare any other office held or activities performed (Articles 41 and 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Board member, advisor, or company officer of private firm Yes. Officials must declare any other office held or activities performed (Articles 26, 41, 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Post-employment No. Absent from legal framework.
Simultaneously holding policy-making position and policy-executing position Yes. Officials must declare any other office held or activities performed (Articles 41 and 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Participating in official decision-making processes that affect private interests Yes. Officials must declare any other office held or activities performed (Articles 41 and 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Concurrent employment of family members in public sector No. Absent from legal framework.

Filing frequency

Filing required upon taking office Yes. A professional officer, non-professional mayor and deputy mayor, an official at the state and of business person and citizen of the Republic of Slovenia, which performs the function of the institutions and other EU bodies and other international institutions to which he was appointed or elected on the basis of employment or the proposal of the Government of the Republic Slovenia and the National Assembly must immediately, no later than one month after entering and leaving the service or work to the Commission the details of their financial situation. Data on assets and income of these persons must also notify the Commission one year after leaving office or work. (Article 41 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Filing required upon leaving office Yes. A professional officer, non-professional mayor and deputy mayor, an official at the state and of business person and citizen of the Republic of Slovenia, which performs the function of the institutions and other EU bodies and other international institutions to which he was appointed or elected on the basis of employment or the proposal of the Government of the Republic Slovenia and the National Assembly must immediately, no later than one month after entering and leaving the service or work to the Commission the details of their financial situation. Data on assets and income of these persons must also notify the Commission one year after leaving office or work. (Article 41 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Filing required annually Yes. The persons responsible for procurement, the Commission information on their financial situation once a year, and up to 31 January each year for the preceding calendar year if, during the previous calendar year involved in the procurement procedure as defined in the 11th point 4 hereof. (Article 41 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Ad hoc filing required upon change in assets or conflicts of interest Yes. An official who perceives a conflict of interest, or the possibility of a conflict of interest, when assuming their job or office or during performing it, shall immediately inform their superior, or the Commission, in case of no superior. (Articles 38 and 43 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))

Sanctions

Sanctions stipulated for late filing (fines, administrative, and/or criminal) Yes. A fine of 400 to 1,200 euros shall be imposed upon a person who: in contravention of the provisions of paragraphs 2 and 3 of Article 41 of this act, fails to communicate information on his assets to the Commission; (Articles 77 (1) of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Sanctions stipulated for non-filing (fines, administrative, and/or criminal) Yes. A fine of 400 to 1,200 euros shall be imposed upon a person who: in contravention of the provisions of paragraphs 2 and 3 of Article 41 of this act, fails to communicate information on his assets to the Commission; (Articles 77 (1) of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Sanctions stipulated for false disclosure (fines, administrative, and/or criminal) Yes. A fine of between EUR 400 and 1200 shall be imposed on individual who acts in contravention of Articles 42 ansd 43 fails to provide the necessary data or provide false data. (Articles 77 (1) of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))

Monitoring and Oversight

Depository body explicitly identified Yes. The Commission for the prevention of corruption is the depository body. (Articles 26 (1), 35 (5), 38, 41(2), 43 (2), and 43 (2) of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Enforcement body explicitly identified Yes. The Commission for the prevention of corruption is the enforcement body or may refer the matter to all other competent authorities for enforcement (Articles 13, 39, 42 (3), 43, 44 and 45 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Some agency assigned responsibility for verifying submission Yes. The Commission may obtain any information from the official records to verify the accuracy of the statements of the with obligation to declare assets and if any inconsistencies of information found the Commission may request the person to enclose relevant evidence with the information specified. (Article 42 (2 and 3) of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Some agency assigned responsibility for verifying accuracy Yes. The Commission may obtain any information from the official records to verify the accuracy of the statements of the with obligation to declare assets and if any inconsistencies of information found the Commission may request the person to enclose relevant evidence with the information specified. (Article 42 (2 and 3) of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))

Public access to declarations

Public availability Yes. Data on the income and assets of the persons with obligations, with exception of persons responsible for public procurement and civil sevants of the National Review Commission, shall be publicly available in the part relating to income and assets obtained during the period of holding a public office or performing an activity and within one year after the termination of the office or activity, irrespective of the restrictions stipulated in the law governing the protection of personal information and the law governing the protection of confidential tax information. (Article 46 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Timing of information release specified Yes. Data shall be publicly available in the part relating to income and assets obtained during the period of holding a public office or performing an activity and within one year after the termination of the office or activityThe data shall be made publicly available for 24 months after the date of the termination of the office or work. A more detailed methodology for publishing the data shall be laid down by the Commission in its Rules of Procedure (Article 46 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Cost of access specified No. Absent from legal framework.

Members of Parliament

Disclosure items

Spouses and children included in disclosure No. Absent from legal framework.
Income and Assets
Real estate Yes. Officials must declare information on immovable property with all the land register information on land plots. (Articles 41 and 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Movable assets Yes. Officials must declare movable property, the value of which exceeds EUR 10 000 (Articles 41 and 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Cash Yes. Officials must declare the total value of cash if it exceeds EUR 10 000 (Articles 41 and 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Loans and Debts Yes. Officials must declare debts, obligations or assumed guarantees and loans given, the value of which exceeds EUR 10 000 (Articles 41 and 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Income from outside employment/assets Yes. Officials must declare information on taxable income under the law governing personal income tax that is not exempt from personal incoem tax; monetary assets deposited in banks, savings banks and savings and loan undertakings, the total value of which in an individual account exceeds EUR 10 000; types and values of securities if, at the time of the declaration of assets, their total value exceeded EUR 10 000 and any other information in relation to assets that to the person with obligations wishes to provide. (Articles 41 and 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Incompatibilities
Gifts received as a public official Yes. Public officials must declare accepted gifts and their value in a list of gifts kept with the body or organisation where they hold office. If Gift value exceeds 75 Euros it becomes the property of the State. (Article 31 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011) )
Private firm ownership and/or stock holdings Yes. Officials must declare information on ownership or stakes, shares, management rights in a company, private institute or any other private activity with a description of the activity and a designation of the registered name or the name of the organization. (Articles 41 and 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Ownership of state-owned enterprises (SOEs) Yes. Officials must declare information on ownership or stakes, shares, management rights in a company, private institute or any other private activity with a description of the activity and a designation of the registered name or the name of the organization. (Articles 41 and 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Holding government contracts Yes. Officials must declare any other office held or activities performed (Articles 41 and 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Board member, advisor, or company officer of private firm Yes. Officials must declare any other office held or activities performed (Articles 26, 41, 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Post-employment No. Absent from legal framework.
Simultaneously holding policy-making position and policy-executing position Yes. Officials must declare any other office held or activities performed (Articles 41 and 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Participating in official decision-making processes that affect private interests Yes. Officials must declare any other office held or activities performed (Articles 41 and 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Concurrent employment of family members in public sector No. Absent from legal framework.

Filing frequency

Filing required upon taking office Yes. A professional official shall immediately, and by no later than within one month after taking or ceasing to hold the office or post, communicate the information on his assets to the commission. And shall also communicate the information on their assets to the Commission a year after ceasing to hold the office or post. (Article 41 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Filing required upon leaving office Yes. A professional official shall immediately, and by no later than within one month after taking or ceasing to hold the office or post, communicate the information on his assets to the commission. And shall also communicate the information on their assets to the Commission a year after ceasing to hold the office or post. (Article 41 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Filing required annually Yes. The persons responsible for procurement, the Commission information on their financial situation once a year, and up to 31 January each year for the preceding calendar year if, during the previous calendar year involved in the procurement procedure as defined in the 11th point 4 hereof. (Article 41 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Ad hoc filing required upon change in assets or conflicts of interest Yes. An official who perceives a conflict of interest, or the possibility of a conflict of interest, when assuming their job or office or during performing it, shall immediately inform their superior, or the Commission, in case of no superior. (Articles 38 and 43 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))

Sanctions

Sanctions stipulated for late filing (fines, administrative, and/or criminal) Yes. A fine of 400 to 1,200 euros shall be imposed upon a person who: in contravention of the provisions of paragraphs 2 and 3 of Article 41 of this act, fails to communicate information on his assets to the Commission; (Articles 77 (1) of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Sanctions stipulated for non-filing (fines, administrative, and/or criminal) Yes. A fine of 400 to 1,200 euros shall be imposed upon a person who: in contravention of the provisions of paragraphs 2 and 3 of Article 41 of this act, fails to communicate information on his assets to the Commission; (Articles 77 (1) of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Sanctions stipulated for false disclosure (fines, administrative, and/or criminal) Yes. A fine of between EUR 400 and 1200 shall be imposed on individual who acts in contravention of Articles 42 ansd 43 fails to provide the necessary data or provide false data. (Articles 77 (1) of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))

Monitoring and Oversight

Depository body explicitly identified Yes. The Commission for the prevention of corruption is the depository body. (Articles 26 (1), 35 (5), 38, 41(2), 43 (2), and 43 (2) of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Enforcement body explicitly identified Yes. The Commission for the prevention of corruption is the enforcement body or may refer the matter to all other competent authorities for enforcement (Articles 13, 39, 42 (3), 43, 44 and 45 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Some agency assigned responsibility for verifying submission Yes. The Commission may obtain any information from the official records to verify the accuracy of the statements of the with obligation to declare assets and if any inconsistencies of information found the Commission may request the person to enclose relevant evidence with the information specified. (Article 42 (2 and 3) of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Some agency assigned responsibility for verifying accuracy Yes. The Commission may obtain any information from the official records to verify the accuracy of the statements of the with obligation to declare assets and if any inconsistencies of information found the Commission may request the person to enclose relevant evidence with the information specified. (Article 42 (2 and 3) of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))

Public access to declarations

Public availability Yes. Data on the income and assets of the persons with obligations, with exception of persons responsible for public procurement and civil sevants of the National Review Commission, shall be publicly available in the part relating to income and assets obtained during the period of holding a public office or performing an activity and within one year after the termination of the office or activity, irrespective of the restrictions stipulated in the law governing the protection of personal information and the law governing the protection of confidential tax information. (Article 46 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Timing of information release specified Yes. Data shall be publicly available in the part relating to income and assets obtained during the period of holding a public office or performing an activity and within one year after the termination of the office or activityThe data shall be made publicly available for 24 months after the date of the termination of the office or work. A more detailed methodology for publishing the data shall be laid down by the Commission in its Rules of Procedure (Article 46 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Cost of access specified No. Absent from legal framework.

Civil servants

Disclosure items

Spouses and children included in disclosure No. Absent from legal framework.
Income and Assets
Real estate Yes. Officials must declare information on immovable property with all the land register information on land plots. (Articles 41 and 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Movable assets Yes. Officials must declare movable property, the value of which exceeds EUR 10 000 (Articles 41 and 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Cash Yes. Officials must declare the total value of cash if it exceeds EUR 10 000 (Articles 41 and 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Loans and Debts Yes. Officials must declare debts, obligations or assumed guarantees and loans given, the value of which exceeds EUR 10 000 (Articles 41 and 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Income from outside employment/assets Yes. Officials must declare information on taxable income under the law governing personal income tax that is not exempt from personal incoem tax; monetary assets deposited in banks, savings banks and savings and loan undertakings, the total value of which in an individual account exceeds EUR 10 000; types and values of securities if, at the time of the declaration of assets, their total value exceeded EUR 10 000 and any other information in relation to assets that to the person with obligations wishes to provide. (Articles 41 and 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Incompatibilities
Gifts received as a public official Yes. Public officials must declare accepted gifts and their value in a list of gifts kept with the body or organisation where they hold office. If Gift value exceeds 75 Euros it becomes the property of the State. (Article 31 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011) )
Private firm ownership and/or stock holdings Yes. Officials must declare information on ownership or stakes, shares, management rights in a company, private institute or any other private activity with a description of the activity and a designation of the registered name or the name of the organization. (Articles 41 and 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Ownership of state-owned enterprises (SOEs) Yes. Officials must declare information on ownership or stakes, shares, management rights in a company, private institute or any other private activity with a description of the activity and a designation of the registered name or the name of the organization. (Articles 41 and 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Holding government contracts Yes. High-ranking civil servants (as define in Article 4)must declare any other office held or activities performed (Articles 41 and 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Board member, advisor, or company officer of private firm Yes. High-ranking civil servants (as define in Article 4)must declare any other office held or activities performed (Articles 41 and 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Post-employment No. Absent from legal framework.
Simultaneously holding policy-making position and policy-executing position Yes. High-ranking civil servants (as define in Article 4)must declare any other office held or activities performed (Articles 41 and 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Participating in official decision-making processes that affect private interests Yes. High-ranking civil servants (as define in Article 4)must declare any other office held or activities performed (Articles 41 and 42 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Concurrent employment of family members in public sector No. Absent from legal framework.

Filing frequency

Filing required upon taking office Yes. A professional official shall immediately, and by no later than within one month after taking or ceasing to hold the office or post, communicate the information on his assets to the commission. And shall also communicate the information on their assets to the Commission a year after ceasing to hold the office or post. (Article 41 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Filing required upon leaving office Yes. A professional official shall immediately, and by no later than within one month after taking or ceasing to hold the office or post, communicate the information on his assets to the commission. And shall also communicate the information on their assets to the Commission a year after ceasing to hold the office or post. (Article 41 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Filing required annually Yes. The persons responsible for procurement, the Commission information on their financial situation once a year, and up to 31 January each year for the preceding calendar year if, during the previous calendar year involved in the procurement procedure as defined in the 11th point 4 hereof. (Article 41 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Ad hoc filing required upon change in assets or conflicts of interest Yes. An official who perceives a conflict of interest, or the possibility of a conflict of interest, when assuming their job or office or during performing it, shall immediately inform their superior, or the Commission, in case of no superior. (Articles 38 and 43 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))

Sanctions

Sanctions stipulated for late filing (fines, administrative, and/or criminal) Yes. A fine of 400 to 1,200 euros shall be imposed upon a person who: in contravention of the provisions of paragraphs 2 and 3 of Article 41 of this act, fails to communicate information on his assets to the Commission; (Articles 77 (1) of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Sanctions stipulated for non-filing (fines, administrative, and/or criminal) Yes. A fine of 400 to 1,200 euros shall be imposed upon a person who: in contravention of the provisions of paragraphs 2 and 3 of Article 41 of this act, fails to communicate information on his assets to the Commission; (Articles 77 (1) of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Sanctions stipulated for false disclosure (fines, administrative, and/or criminal) Yes. A fine of between EUR 400 and 1200 shall be imposed on individual who acts in contravention of Articles 42 ansd 43 fails to provide the necessary data or provide false data. (Articles 77 (1) of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))

Monitoring and Oversight

Depository body explicitly identified Yes. The Commission for the prevention of corruption is the depository body. (Articles 26 (1), 35 (5), 38, 41(2), 43 (2), and 43 (2) of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Enforcement body explicitly identified Yes. The Commission for the prevention of corruption is the enforcement body or may refer the matter to all other competent authorities for enforcement (Articles 13, 39, 42 (3), 43, 44 and 45 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Some agency assigned responsibility for verifying submission Yes. The Commission may obtain any information from the official records to verify the accuracy of the statements of the with obligation to declare assets and if any inconsistencies of information found the Commission may request the person to enclose relevant evidence with the information specified. (Article 42 (2 and 3) of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Some agency assigned responsibility for verifying accuracy Yes. The Commission may obtain any information from the official records to verify the accuracy of the statements of the with obligation to declare assets and if any inconsistencies of information found the Commission may request the person to enclose relevant evidence with the information specified. (Article 42 (2 and 3) of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))

Public access to declarations

Public availability Yes. Data on the income and assets of the persons with obligations, with exception of persons responsible for public procurement and civil sevants of the National Review Commission, shall be publicly available in the part relating to income and assets obtained during the period of holding a public office or performing an activity and within one year after the termination of the office or activity, irrespective of the restrictions stipulated in the law governing the protection of personal information and the law governing the protection of confidential tax information. (Article 46 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Timing of information release specified Yes. Data shall be publicly available in the part relating to income and assets obtained during the period of holding a public office or performing an activity and within one year after the termination of the office or activityThe data shall be made publicly available for 24 months after the date of the termination of the office or work. A more detailed methodology for publishing the data shall be laid down by the Commission in its Rules of Procedure (Article 46 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Location(s) of access specified Yes. The data shall be published on the website of the Commission (Article 46 of the Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, last amended 2011))
Cost of access specified No. Absent from legal framework.

Qualitative data for 2017


Legislation

Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act, 2010, amended 2011 (English)pdf

Conflict of Interest

All Slovenian public officials are obliged to alleviate conflicts of interests immediately, as to the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011). This law further prevents the Head of State, Ministers, and Members of Parliament from accepting gifts, pursuing any other position or employment that generates income, holding supervisory functions in an enterprise, and holding government contracts. In addition, they must immediately withdraw from decision-making where it may affect private interests. The possibilities for Head of State, Ministers, and Members of Parliament to establish business relations with government entities after ending tenure are limited. Slightly fewer restrictions are imposed on Civil Servants. According to the Civil Servants Act (2002) they may not perform activities which harm free competition or public official’s impartiality. This would prevent Civil Servants from holding managerial or advisory positions in public or private companies.

All public officials face the same sanctions in case of violations. These may consist of a fine from EUR 400 and 1,200 or removal from office. The Commission for the Prevention of Corruption provides all public officials with training and tracks data on conflicts of interests. It also functions as enforcement body in case of violations by any public official.


Quantitative Data

Primary Metric

2012201520162017Trend
Restrictions65808080
Sanctions92676767
Monitoring and Oversight88100100100

Alternative Metric

2012201520162017Trend
Head of State73868686
Ministers90868686
Members of Parliament76868686
Civil servants87727272

Values lie in range between 0 and 100, higher values implying higher legislation comprehensiveness


Qualitative Data

We are frequently reviewing and refining our data, so in case you notice any mistake in our assessment, feel free to send us an email by clicking the button ()

Head of State

Restrictions

General restriction on conflict of interest Yes. An official person shall pay attention to any actual or possible conflict of interest and shall make every effort to avoid it. An official person may not use his office or post to advance his personal interests or the personal interests of another person (Article 37 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))
Accepting gifts Yes. An official may not accept gifts or other benefits in connection with the discharge of the duties of the office, the exceptions being protocol gifts and occasional gifts which are small in value. Protocol gifts are gifts given to officials by representatives of other State bodies, other countries and international organisations and institutions on the occasions of visits, guest appearances and other occasions. Occasional gifts of small value are gifts given on special occasions that do not exceed EUR 75 in value, and a total value that does not exceed EUR 150 during a particular year when they are received from the same person. In Nocircumstances may money, securities or precious metals be accepted as a gift of small value. An official may not accept gifts that have affected or might affect the objective and impartial discharge of the duties of his office, irrespective of their value. (Article 30 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))
Private firm ownership and/or stock holdings Yes. The office of President of the Republic is incompatible with any other public office or occupation. A professional official holding a public office may not be engaged in any professional or other activity aimed at generating income or proceeds. A professional official may not be a member of a company, economic interest grouping, cooperative, public institute, public fund, public agency, or other entity governed by public or private law, or engaged in management, supervision or representation activities in these entities, the exceptions being societies, institutions and political parties. (Article 105 of the Constitution (2000, amended in 2013) Article 26-27 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))
Ownership of state-owned enterprises (SOEs) Yes. The office of President of the Republic is incompatible with any other public office or occupation. A professional official holding a public office may not be engaged in any professional or other activity aimed at generating income or proceeds. A professional official may not be a member of a company, economic interest grouping, cooperative, public institute, public fund, public agency, or other entity governed by public or private law, or engaged in management, supervision or representation activities in these entities, the exceptions being societies, institutions and political parties. (Article 105 of the Constitution (2000, amended in 2013) Article 26-27 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))
Holding government contracts Yes. A public sector body or organisation which is committed to conducting a public procurement procedure in accordance with the regulations on public procurement or which carries out the procedure for granting concessions or other forms of public--‐ private partnership, may not order goods, services or construction works, enter into public--‐private partnerships or grant special and exclusive rights to entities in which the official who holds office in the body or organisation concerned or in cases where the official's family member has the following role: – participating as a manager, management member or legal representative; or – has more than a 5% level of participation in the founders' rights, management or capital, either by direct participation or through the participation of other legal persons.. (Article 35 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))
Board member, advisor, or company officer of private firm Yes. The office of President of the Republic is incompatible with any other public office or occupation. A professional official holding a public office may not be engaged in any professional or other activity aimed at generating income or proceeds. A professional official may not be a member of a company, economic interest grouping, cooperative, public institute, public fund, public agency, or other entity governed by public or private law, or engaged in management, supervision or representation activities in these entities, the exceptions being societies, institutions and political parties. (Article 105 of the Constitution (2000, amended in 2006) Article 26-27 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))
Post-employment Yes. An official may not act as a representative of a business entity that has established or is about to establish business contacts with the body in which the official held office until two years have elapsed from the termination of his office. The body in which the official held office may not do business with the entity in which the former official has a 5% participation in the founders' rights, management or capital, either by direct participation or through the participation of other legal persons until one year has elapsed from the termination of the office. (Article 36 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))
Simultaneously holding policy-making position and policy-executing position Yes. The office of President of the Republic is incompatible with any other public office or occupation. A professional official holding a public office may not be engaged in any professional or other activity aimed at generating income or proceeds. (Article 105 of the Constitution (2000, amended in 2013) Article 26 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))
Participating in official decision-making processes that affect private interests Yes. Unless otherwise provided by another Act, an official person who, upon taking up a post or office or during the performance of the du1es of the post or office, finds that a conflict of interest has arisen or might arise must immediately inform his superior in wri1ng, and if he has Nosuperior, the Commission. In so doing, the official person shall immediately cease to perform any work with regard to the matter in which the conflict of interest has arisen, unless the delay would pose a risk. (Article 38 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))
Assisting family or friends in obtaining employment in public sector No. Absent from legal framework.

Sanctions

Fines are stipulated for violations of COI regulations restricting behavior Yes. A fine of between EUR 400 and EUR 1 200 shall be imposed (Article 77 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))
Administrative sanctions are stipulated for violations of COI regulations restricting behavior Yes. If the Commission establishes that the official continues to perform the activity, hold a membership, or hold an office after the time limit set by the Commission has expired, it shall inform the relevant authority competent to propose or commence a procedure for the removal of the official from office. (Article 29 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))
Penal sanctions are stipulated for violations of COI regulations restricting behavior No. Absent from legal framework.

Monitoring and Oversight

Monitoring body specified (guidance, training, data tracking) Yes. The Commission shall provide training. The Commission shall store the data, information and documentation obtained pursuant to this Act for a period of ten years. (Article 76 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))
Enforcement body specified (sanctions, hearings) Yes. The Commission for the Prevention of Corruption may initate proceedings relating to the violation of the rules on conflicts of interest (Article 13 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))

Ministers

Restrictions

General restriction on conflict of interest Yes. An official person shall pay attention to any actual or possible conflict of interest and shall make every effort to avoid it. An official person may not use his office or post to advance his personal interests or the personal interests of another person (Article 37 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))
Accepting gifts Yes. An official may not accept gifts or other benefits in connection with the discharge of the duties of the office, the exceptions being protocol gifts and occasional gifts which are small in value. Protocol gifts are gifts given to officials by representatives of other State bodies, other countries and international organisations and institutions on the occasions of visits, guest appearances and other occasions. Occasional gifts of small value are gifts given on special occasions that do not exceed EUR 75 in value, and a total value that does not exceed EUR 150 during a particular year when they are received from the same person. In Nocircumstances may money, securities or precious metals be accepted as a gift of small value. An official may not accept gifts that have affected or might affect the objective and impartial discharge of the duties of his office, irrespective of their value. (Article 30 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))
Private firm ownership and/or stock holdings Yes. A professional official holding a public office may not be engaged in any professional or other activity aimed at generating income or proceeds. A professional official may not be a member of a company, economic interest grouping, cooperative, public institute, public fund, public agency, or other entity governed by public or private law, or engaged in management, supervision or representation activities in these entities, the exceptions being societies, institutions and political parties. (Article 26-27 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))
Ownership of state-owned enterprises (SOEs) Yes. A professional official holding a public office may not be engaged in any professional or other activity aimed at generating income or proceeds. A professional official may not be a member of a company, economic interest grouping, cooperative, public institute, public fund, public agency, or other entity governed by public or private law, or engaged in management, supervision or representation activities in these entities, the exceptions being societies, institutions and political parties. (Article 26-27 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))
Holding government contracts Yes. A public sector body or organisation which is committed to conducting a public procurement procedure in accordance with the regulations on public procurement or which carries out the procedure for granting concessions or other forms of public--‐ private partnership, may not order goods, services or construction works, enter into public--‐private partnerships or grant special and exclusive rights to entities in which the official who holds office in the body or organisation concerned or in cases where the official's family member has the following role: – participating as a manager, management member or legal representative; or – has more than a 5% level of participation in the founders' rights, management or capital, either by direct participation or through the participation of other legal persons.. (Article 35 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))
Board member, advisor, or company officer of private firm Yes. A professional official holding a public office may not be engaged in any professional or other activity aimed at generating income or proceeds. A professional official may not be a member of a company, economic interest grouping, cooperative, public institute, public fund, public agency, or other entity governed by public or private law, or engaged in management, supervision or representation activities in these entities, the exceptions being societies, institutions and political parties. (Article 26-27 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))
Post-employment Yes. An official may not act as a representative of a business entity that has established or is about to establish business contacts with the body in which the official held office until two years have elapsed from the termination of his office. The body in which the official held office may not do business with the entity in which the former official has a 5% participation in the founders' rights, management or capital, either by direct participation or through the participation of other legal persons until one year has elapsed from the termination of the office. (Article 36 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))
Simultaneously holding policy-making position and policy-executing position Yes. The Prime Minister and the Ministers may not simultaneously hold office in State bodies, courts, local authorities or other public office nor carry out other activities which, pursuant to the law, are not compatible with the office of a member of the Government. A professional official holding a public office may not be engaged in any professional or other activity aimed at generating income or proceeds. (Article 10 of the Government Act (1993) Article 26 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))
Participating in official decision-making processes that affect private interests Yes. Unless otherwise provided by another Act, an official person who, upon taking up a post or office or during the performance of the du1es of the post or office, finds that a conflict of interest has arisen or might arise must immediately inform his superior in wri1ng, and if he has Nosuperior, the Commission. In so doing, the official person shall immediately cease to perform any work with regard to the matter in which the conflict of interest has arisen, unless the delay would pose a risk. (Article 38 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))
Assisting family or friends in obtaining employment in public sector No. Absent from legal framework.

Sanctions

Fines are stipulated for violations of COI regulations restricting behavior Yes. A fine of between EUR 400 and EUR 1 200 shall be imposed (Article 77 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))
Administrative sanctions are stipulated for violations of COI regulations restricting behavior Yes. If the Commission establishes that the official continues to perform the activity, hold a membership, or hold an office after the time limit set by the Commission has expired, it shall inform the relevant authority competent to propose or commence a procedure for the removal of the official from office. (Article 29 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))
Penal sanctions are stipulated for violations of COI regulations restricting behavior No. Absent from legal framework.

Monitoring and Oversight

Monitoring body specified (guidance, training, data tracking) Yes. The Commission shall provide training. The Commission shall store the data, information and documentation obtained pursuant to this Act for a period of ten years. (Article 76 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))
Enforcement body specified (sanctions, hearings) Yes. The Commission for the Prevention of Corruption may initate proceedings relating to the violation of the rules on conflicts of interest (Article 13 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))

Members of Parliament

Restrictions

General restriction on conflict of interest Yes. An official person shall pay attention to any actual or possible conflict of interest and shall make every effort to avoid it. An official person may not use his office or post to advance his personal interests or the personal interests of another person (Article 37 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))
Accepting gifts Yes. An official may not accept gifts or other benefits in connection with the discharge of the duties of the office, the exceptions being protocol gifts and occasional gifts which are small in value. Protocol gifts are gifts given to officials by representatives of other State bodies, other countries and international organisations and institutions on the occasions of visits, guest appearances and other occasions. Occasional gifts of small value are gifts given on special occasions that do not exceed EUR 75 in value, and a total value that does not exceed EUR 150 during a particular year when they are received from the same person. In Nocircumstances may money, securities or precious metals be accepted as a gift of small value. An official may not accept gifts that have affected or might affect the objective and impartial discharge of the duties of his office, irrespective of their value. (Article 30 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))
Private firm ownership and/or stock holdings Yes. The law shall establish who may not be elected a deputy, and the incompatibility of the office of deputy with other offices and activities. A professional official holding a public office may not be engaged in any professional or other activity aimed at generating income or proceeds. A professional official may not be a member of a company, economic interest grouping, cooperative, public institute, public fund, public agency, or other entity governed by public or private law, or engaged in management, supervision or representation activities in these entities, the exceptions being societies, institutions and political parties. (Article 12 of the Deputies Act, 2005 Article 82 of the Constitution (2000, amended in 2013) Article 26-27 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))
Ownership of state-owned enterprises (SOEs) Yes. The law shall establish who may not be elected a deputy, and the incompatibility of the office of deputy with other offices and activities. A professional official holding a public office may not be engaged in any professional or other activity aimed at generating income or proceeds. A professional official may not be a member of a company, economic interest grouping, cooperative, public institute, public fund, public agency, or other entity governed by public or private law, or engaged in management, supervision or representation activities in these entities, the exceptions being societies, institutions and political parties. (Article 82 of the Constitution (2000, amended in 2013) Article 26-27 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))
Holding government contracts Yes. A public sector body or organisation which is committed to conducting a public procurement procedure in accordance with the regulations on public procurement or which carries out the procedure for granting concessions or other forms of public--‐ private partnership, may not order goods, services or construction works, enter into public--‐private partnerships or grant special and exclusive rights to entities in which the official who holds office in the body or organisation concerned or in cases where the official's family member has the following role: – participating as a manager, management member or legal representative; or – has more than a 5% level of participation in the founders' rights, management or capital, either by direct participation or through the participation of other legal persons.. (Article 35 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))
Board member, advisor, or company officer of private firm Yes. The law shall establish who may not be elected a deputy, and the incompatibility of the office of deputy with other offices and activities. A professional official holding a public office may not be engaged in any professional or other activity aimed at generating income or proceeds. A deputy may not be a member of the Supervisory Board of the company. A professional official may not be a member of a company, economic interest grouping, cooperative, public institute, public fund, public agency, or other entity governed by public or private law, or engaged in management, supervision or representation activities in these entities, the exceptions being societies, institutions and political parties. (Article 82 of the Constitution (2000, amended in 2013) Article 26-27 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))
Post-employment Yes. An official may not act as a representative of a business entity that has established or is about to establish business contacts with the body in which the official held office until two years have elapsed from the termination of his office. The body in which the official held office may not do business with the entity in which the former official has a 5% participation in the founders' rights, management or capital, either by direct participation or through the participation of other legal persons until one year has elapsed from the termination of the office. (Article 36 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))
Simultaneously holding policy-making position and policy-executing position Yes. A deputy may not be simultaneously a member of the National Council nor perform other functions or work in state bodies. A deputy may not be a professional to perform the functions of local government bodies. The law shall establish who may not be elected a deputy, and the incompatibility of the office of deputy with other offices and activities. A professional official holding a public office may not be engaged in any professional or other activity aimed at generating income or proceeds. (Article 10 of the Deputies Act, 2005 Article 82 of the Constitution (2000, amended in 2013) Article 26 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))
Participating in official decision-making processes that affect private interests Yes. Unless otherwise provided by another Act, an official person who, upon taking up a post or office or during the performance of the du1es of the post or office, finds that a conflict of interest has arisen or might arise must immediately inform his superior in wri1ng, and if he has Nosuperior, the Commission. In so doing, the official person shall immediately cease to perform any work with regard to the matter in which the conflict of interest has arisen, unless the delay would pose a risk. (Article 38 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))
Assisting family or friends in obtaining employment in public sector No. Absent from legal framework.

Sanctions

Fines are stipulated for violations of COI regulations restricting behavior Yes. A fine of between EUR 400 and EUR 1 200 shall be imposed (Article 77 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))
Administrative sanctions are stipulated for violations of COI regulations restricting behavior Yes. If the Commission establishes that the official continues to perform the activity, hold a membership, or hold an office after the time limit set by the Commission has expired, it shall inform the relevant authority competent to propose or commence a procedure for the removal of the official from office. (Article 29 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))
Penal sanctions are stipulated for violations of COI regulations restricting behavior No. Absent from legal framework.

Monitoring and Oversight

Monitoring body specified (guidance, training, data tracking) Yes. The Commission shall provide training. The Commission shall store the data, information and documentation obtained pursuant to this Act for a period of ten years. (Article 76 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))
Enforcement body specified (sanctions, hearings) Yes. The Commission for the Prevention of Corruption may initate proceedings relating to the violation of the rules on conflicts of interest (Article 13 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))

Civil servants

Restrictions

General restriction on conflict of interest Yes. An official person shall pay attention to any actual or possible conflict of interest and shall make every effort to avoid it. An official person may not use his office or post to advance his personal interests or the personal interests of another person (Article 37 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))
Accepting gifts Yes. A civil servant who performs public functions may not accept gifts in connection with the provision of services, except for protocol gifts of small value and occasional gifts of small value. Civil servants shall not accept gifts in connection with their employment, nor gifts of negligible value: if release or the acceptance of such gifts constituted a criminal offense, if this is forbidden in accordance with the law or regulations issued pursuant thereto, or if as a gift to deliver cash or securities, vouchers, gift tokens and precious metals. (Article 3 of the Regulation of constraints and obligations of civil servants regarding the acceptance of gifts (2003, amended 2015))
Private firm ownership and/or stock holdings Yes. Officials may not perform other activities: 1. if the activity violates the prohibition of competition or the competition clause pursuant to the law governing employment; 2. if the performance of activity might affect the impartiality of the performance of work; 3. if the performance of activity might result in the abuse of data accessible at the performance of the tasks at work, that are not accessible to the public; 4. if the performance of activity is harmful to the reputation of the body. (Article 100 of the Civil Servants Act (2002) )
Ownership of state-owned enterprises (SOEs) Yes. Officials may not perform other activities: 1. if the activity violates the prohibition of competition or the competition clause pursuant to the law governing employment; 2. if the performance of activity might affect the impartiality of the performance of work; 3. if the performance of activity might result in the abuse of data accessible at the performance of the tasks at work, that are not accessible to the public; 4. if the performance of activity is harmful to the reputation of the body. (Article 100 of the Civil Servants Act (2002) )
Holding government contracts Yes. Officials may not perform other activities: 1. if the activity violates the prohibition of competition or the competition clause pursuant to the law governing employment; 2. if the performance of activity might affect the impartiality of the performance of work; 3. if the performance of activity might result in the abuse of data accessible at the performance of the tasks at work, that are not accessible to the public; 4. if the performance of activity is harmful to the reputation of the body. (Article 100 of the Civil Servants Act (2002) )
Board member, advisor, or company officer of private firm No. Absent from legal framework.
Post-employment No. Absent from legal framework.
Simultaneously holding policy-making position and policy-executing position No. Absent from legal framework.
Participating in official decision-making processes that affect private interests No. Absent from legal framework.
Assisting family or friends in obtaining employment in public sector No. Absent from legal framework.

Sanctions

Fines are stipulated for violations of COI regulations restricting behavior Yes. A fine of between EUR 400 and EUR 1 200 shall be imposed (Article 77 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))
Administrative sanctions are stipulated for violations of COI regulations restricting behavior Yes. If the Commission establishes that the official continues to perform the activity, hold a membership, or hold an office after the time limit set by the Commission has expired, it shall inform the relevant authority competent to propose or commence a procedure for the removal of the official from office. (Article 29 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))
Penal sanctions are stipulated for violations of COI regulations restricting behavior No. Absent from legal framework.

Monitoring and Oversight

Monitoring body specified (guidance, training, data tracking) Yes. The Commission shall provide training. The Commission shall store the data, information and documentation obtained pursuant to this Act for a period of ten years. (Article 76 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))
Enforcement body specified (sanctions, hearings) Yes. The Commission for the Prevention of Corruption may initate proceedings relating to the violation of the rules on conflicts of interest (Article 13 of the Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act (2010, amended in 2011))

Qualitative data for 2017


Legislation

Civil Servants Act, 2002 (English)pdf
Constitution, 2000, amended in 2006 (English)pdf
Deputies Act, 2005 (Slovenian)pdf
Integrity of Prevention of Corruption Act, 2010, amended 2011 (English)pdf
Regulation of constraints and obligations of civil servants regarding the acceptance of gifts (2003) (English)pdf

Freedom of Information

Slovenia's freedom of information regime is grounded in its Constitution (1991) and implementing measures are outlined in the Access to Public Information Act (2003, amended 2015). The FOI law applies to state bodies, local government bodies, public agencies, public funds and other entities of public law, public powers holders and public service contractors.

Specific exemptions to disclosure are outlined in the aforementioned FOI law, the Classified Information Act (2001), and the Personal Data Protection Act (2004). However, there is a public interest test whereby exemptions to disclosure may be overridden in cases where the public interest outweighs the prohibition on disclosure.

Appeals may be filed with public authorities and with the courts. There is also an appeals process established through the Information Commissioner.

Fines are levied on officials by the Commissioner for intentionally making information inaccessible to the public, or for not transmitting the requested public information within the prescribed time limit. The Ministry of Public Administration performs inspection and supervision over the implementation process.


Quantitative Data

Primary Metric

2012201520162017Trend
Scope and Coverage100100100100
Information access and release83838383
Exceptions and Overrides100100100100
Sanctions for non-compliance33336767
Monitoring and Oversight83838383

Values lie in range between 0 and 100, higher values implying higher legislation comprehensiveness


Qualitative Data

We are frequently reviewing and refining our data, so in case you notice any mistake in our assessment, feel free to send us an email by clicking the button ()

Scope and Coverage

Scope of disclosure

Existence of legal right to access Yes. Except in such cases as are provided by law, everyone has the right to obtain information of a public nature in which he has a well founded legal interest under law. (Article 39 of Constitution of Slovenia, 1991)
"Information" or "Documents" is defined Yes. (1) Public information is information that comes from the field of work, and is located in the form of a document, file, register, record or other documentary material (hereinafter: document) by the body itself, in cooperation with other authorities, or acquired from other persons. (Article 4 of the Access to Public Information Act, 2003, amended 2015)
Proactive disclosure is specified Yes. (1) This Decree lays down the method by which public information shall be provided to applicants and published on the Word Wide Web, as well as the charging of costs for provision, reuse of information, price and other terms of such use and reporting on provision of access to public sector information. (Article 1 of the Regulation on the Provision of Public Information, 2016)

Coverage of public and private sectors

Executive branch Yes. (1) This Act governs the procedure which ensures everyone free access to and re-use of public information held by state bodies, local government bodies, public agencies, public funds and other entities of public law, public powers holders and public service contractors (hereinafter referred to as "the bodies"). (Article 1 of the Access to Public Information Act, 2003, amended 2015)
Legislative branch Yes. (1) This Act governs the procedure which ensures everyone free access to and re-use of public information held by state bodies, local government bodies, public agencies, public funds and other entities of public law, public powers holders and public service contractors (hereinafter referred to as "the bodies"). (Article 1 of the Access to Public Information Act, 2003, amended 2015)
Judicial branch Yes. (1) This Act governs the procedure which ensures everyone free access to and re-use of public information held by state bodies, local government bodies, public agencies, public funds and other entities of public law, public powers holders and public service contractors (hereinafter referred to as "the bodies"). (Article 1 of the Access to Public Information Act, 2003, amended 2015)
Other public bodies Yes. (1) This Act governs the procedure which ensures everyone free access to and re-use of public information held by state bodies, local government bodies, public agencies, public funds and other entities of public law, public powers holders and public service contractors (hereinafter referred to as "the bodies"). (Article 1 of the Access to Public Information Act, 2003, amended 2015)
Private sector Yes. (1) This Act governs the procedure which ensures everyone free access to and re-use of public information held by state bodies, local government bodies, public agencies, public funds and other entities of public law, public powers holders and public service contractors (hereinafter referred to as "the bodies"). (Article 1 of the Access to Public Information Act, 2003, amended 2015)

Access to specific documents (subject to reactive and/or proactive disclosure)

Draft legal instruments Yes. Citizens are given the right to access proposed (draft) regulations, programs, strategies, and other similar documents and products of the public governmental bodies. The National Assembly, ministries, local authorities, and holders of public authority must publish on the world-wide-web draft laws, rules, acts, programs, or strategies prior to their proclamation or adoption. (Article 10 of the Access to Public Information Act, 2003, amended 2015 Articles 2 and 7-11 of the Regulation on the Provision of Public Information, 2016)
Enacted legal instruments Yes. The government and other public bodies are obligated to provide access to the consolidated text of regulations, programs, strategies, views, opinions, instructions, public procurement documents, and information on their activities and services by publishing this information on the world-wide-web. Citizens have the right to access legal instruments and documents of public character by requiring public bodies to maintain an up-to-date catalogue of public information that includes regulations, unofficial consolidated text of founding acts, strategies, and programs, among other things. (Article 10 of the Access to Public Information Act, 2003, amended 2015 Articles 2, 7-11 of the Regulation on the Provision of Public Information, 2016)
Annual budgets Yes. Citizens have the right of access to public information produced by public bodies, and other reports created by public bodies that are relevant to the bodies’ respective area of expertise. (Article 10 of the Access to Public Information Act, 2003, amended 2015 Articles 2 and 7-11 of the Regulation on the Provision of Public Information, 2016 )
Annual chart of accounts (actual expenditures) Yes. Citizens have the right of access to public information produced by public bodies, and other reports created by public bodies that are relevant to the bodies’ respective area of expertise. (Article 10 of the Access to Public Information Act, 2003, amended 2015 Articles 2, 7-11 of the Regulation on the Provision of Public Information, 2016 )
Annual reports of public entities and programs Yes. Citizens have the right of access to annual reports of public entities. (Article 9 of the Regulation on the Provision of Public Information, 2016)

Information access and release

Procedural access

Universal access (agencies, citizens and non-citizens) Yes. (1)Legal entities or natural persons (hereinafter referred to as "the applicants") have free access to public information. (Article 5 of the Access to Public Information Act, 2003, amended 2015)
Type of request is specified (written, electronic, oral) Yes. Written, oral (informal), and electronic requests are allowed. (Articles 12, 14, 16 of the Access to Public Information Act, 2003, amended 2015)
Assistance to requesters must be provided by law (includes barriers due to language differences, illiteracy, complexity of requests, etc.) Yes. (1)If the request is incomplete and, hence, the body cannot deal with it, the body must invite the applicant to supplement it within the time limit laid down by the body. The time limit may not be less than 3 working days. (2)Official referred to in Article 9 of this Act is obliged to provide the applicant with the appropriate assistance in supplementing the request. (7) Parties and other participants in a proceeding who do not speak the language in which the proceeding is conducted, or who cannot use it because of their disability, shall have the right to follow the course of the proceeding through an interpreter. The agency shall be obliged to instruct such persons of such a possibility. (Article 18 of the Access to Public Information Act, 2003, amended 2015 Article 62 of the General Administrative Procedure Act, 1999, amended 2006)
Cost of access is specified (free, request fees, photocopying costs, other administrative costs) Yes. The law provides for nominal fees, at most, to be charged for providing documents or requested information. Cost schedules are also provided under this Act. (Articles 10, 34, 34a, and 35 of the Article 24 of the Access to Public Information Act, 2003, amended 2015)

Deadlines for release of information

20-day response deadline Yes. Answers to requests for information must be furnished within 20 working days from the day the completed request was received. (Article 23 of the Access to Public Information Act, 2003, amended 2015)
Agency granted right to extend response time Yes. The law provides for the right to extend the response time under exceptional circumstances for not more than 30 working days. (Article 24 of the Access to Public Information Act, 2003, amended 2015)
Maximum total response time of no more than 40 days No. The maximum time to respond to request for information is 50 days – the original 20 days plus an additional 30-day extension if necessary. (Article 24 of the Access to Public Information Act, 2003, amended 2015)

Exceptions and Overrides

Exemptions to disclosure

Existence of secrecy/states secrets law Yes. Classified Information Act, 2001 (Classified Information Act, 2001, amended 2011)
Existence of personal privacy/data law Yes. Personal Data Protection Act, 2004 (Personal Data Protection Act, 2004, amended 2007)
Specific exemptions to disclosure Yes. Specific exemptions to coverage are provided. These exemptions include classified data, business secrets, personal data, confidential tax information,information that may negatively impact criminal prosecution, administrative procedure (if it was acquired for purposes of such procedure), civil procedure (if it was drawn up for purposes of civil procedure), classified information, intellectual property rights, and foreign-prepared tax information, and information that may harm culture. Partial exemption to coverage (partial disclosure) for any of these reasons is allowed. Disclosure of personal data to individuals requesting personal data relating to them is further limited. It further limits individuals’ rights to access information in the name of national defense, security, political and economic interests of the state, the exercise of the responsibilities of the police, the prevention, discovery, detection, proving and prosecution of criminal offences and minor offences, the discovery and punishment of violations of ethical norms for certain professions, for monetary, budgetary or tax reasons, supervision of the police, and protection of the individual to whom the personal data relate, or the rights and freedoms of others. Disclosure of classified information is limited. (Article 6 of the of the Access to Public Information Act, 2003, amended 2015 Article 36 of the Personal Data Protection Act, 2004, amended 2007 Article 1 of the Classified Information Act, 2001, amended 2011)
Public Interest test: Specified exemptions to disclosure may be overridden in cases where disclosure of information benefits the public interest.

Appeals

Appeals allowed within public entities Yes. The right to appeal within a public entity exists. (Article 27 of the Access to Public Information Act, 2003, amended 2015)
Independent, non-judicial appeals mechanism, e.g., information commissioner. Does not include Ombudsman unless appeals decisions are binding. Yes. The law sets forth the Information Commissioner’s competence to decide an appeal. (Article 2 of the Information Commissioner Act, 2005, amended 2007)
Judicial appeals mechanism Yes. A mechanism is provided to appeal through the court system. (Article 27 of the Access to Public Information Act, 2003, amended 2015 )

Sanctions for non-compliance

Administrative sanctions are specified for violations of disclosure requirements No. Absent from legal framework.
Fines are specified for violations of disclosure requirements Yes. Fines are levied on officials for intentionally making information inaccessible to the public, or for not transmitting the requested public information within the prescribed time limit. (Article 39 of the Access to Public Information Act, 2003, amended 2015 Article 15 of the Information Commissioner Act, 2005)
Criminal sanctions are specified for violations of disclosure requirements Yes. The law envisages criminal sanctions in the Title IX Penal Provisions. (Article 39 and 39a of the Access to Public Information Act, 2003, last amended 2015)

Monitoring and Oversight

Information officers must be appointed in public agencies Yes. Public entities are required to designate a point of contact for public information requests. (Article 9 of the Access to Public Information Act, 2003, amended 2015)
Public body that is responsible for applying sanctions Yes. The Information Commissioner will be responsible for applying sanctions. (Article 2 of the Information Commissioner Act, 2005, amended 2007)
Public body that is responsible for public outreach (raising public awareness) Yes. (1) The Ministry of Public Administration shall perform promotional and developmental tasks in relation to access to public information. (2) Tasks of the Ministry referred to in the preceding paragraph are in particular (as follows): 1. Informing the public about the means and conditions for the access to public information; 2. Providing counseling to other bodies in relation to the application of the provisions of this Act; 3. Other promotional and developmental tasks. (Article 32 of the Access to Public Information Act, 2003, amended 2015)
Nodal agency for RTI (implementation support/compliance within public sector). Does not include Ombudsman. Yes. The Ministry of Public Administration performs inspection and supervision over the implementation of this Act. The Commissioner is also within the frame of the appellate proceeding for the supervision over the implementation of this Act and executive acts based on the Act. The Information Commissioner will be responsible for implementing the Act, as well as other provisions regulating public information. (Article 32 of the Access to Public Information Act, 2003, amended 2015 Article 2 of the Information Commissioner Act, 2005, amended 2007)
Ombudsman involvement in implementation is specified by law No. Absent from legal framework.
Reporting of data and/or implementation is required Yes. (1)The body is obliged to draw up an annual report on the implementation of this Act and submit it to the Ministry by 31 January for the previous year. (Article 37 of the Access to Public Information Act, 2003, amended 2015)

Qualitative data for 2017


Legislation

Constitution of Slovenia,1991, amended 2013 (English)pdf
Access to Public Information Act, 2003, amended 2015 (English)pdf
Regulation on the Provision of Public Information, 2016 (Slovenian)pdf
General Administrative Procedure Act, 1999, amended 2006 (Slovenian)pdf
Personal Data Protection Act, 2004, amended 2007 (English)pdf
Classified Information Act, 2001, amended 2011 (Slovenian)pdf
Information Commissioner Act, 2005, amended 2007 (Slovenian)pdf

Public Procurement

The Slovenian public procurement system is regulated by the Public Procurement Act (ZJN-3) (2016). Public procurement regulation is dedicated to the Ministry of Public Administration and Ministry of Finance.

The lowest minimum thresholds for conducting a public procurement tender are:

  • EUR 20000 for goods
  • EUR 40000 for works
  • EUR 20000 for services

The minimum number of bidders is 5 for restricted procedures and 3 for negotiated procedures and competitive dialogue. The minimum submission period is 35 days for open procedures, 30 days for restricted and negotiated procedures from dispatch date. The final beneficial owners do not have to be disclosed when placing a bid.

There is no preferential treatment based on SME status, but environmental considerations can play a role in the awarding procedure. Bid exclusion can be based on abnormally low offer prices (but it is not automatic), participation in criminal organization, company registration with negative references etc.

In the bid evaluation phase, there are no conflict of interest restrictions on the composition of the evaluation committee and no form of independence from the contracting authority is mandated for the evaluation committee.

 

There is a payable fee in case of an arbitration procedure, which is EUR 1500 for low value contracts and EUR 3500 for normal contracts if the appeal is related to publication, invitation or tender documentation. The fee is 2% of the contract value (but at least 500 EUR and maximum EUR 25000) if the contract is already awarded. Decisions or the National Review Procedure are published online.


Quantitative Data

Primary Metric

2012201520162017Trend
Scope929097
Information availability464646
Evaluation757581
Open competition787875
Institutional arrangements292929

Values lie in range between 0 and 100, higher values implying higher legislation comprehensiveness


Qualitative Data

We are frequently reviewing and refining our data, so in case you notice any mistake in our assessment, feel free to send us an email by clicking the button ()

Scope

Threshold - lowest PP

What is the minimum contract value above which the public procurement law is applied? (Product type GOODS) EUR 20000. Article 21(1)(a): Thresholds for publication is EUR 20000 (public sector). (Public Procurement Act (ZJN-3), 2016, Article 21(1))
What is the minimum contract value above which the public procurement law is applied? (Product type WORKS) EUR 40000. Article 21(1)(a): Thresholds for publication is EUR 40000 (public sector). (Public Procurement Act (ZJN-3), 2016, Article 21(1))
What is the minimum contract value above which the public procurement law is applied? (Product type SERVICES) EUR 20000. Article 21(1)(a): Thresholds for publication is EUR 20000 (public sector). (Public Procurement Act (ZJN-3), 2016, Article 21(1))

Threshold - by PP type

What are the minimum application thresholds for the procurement type? (Entity: PUBLIC SECTOR) EUR 20000. Article 21(1)(a): Thresholds for publication is EUR 20000 for goods and services and design contest; EUR 40000 for works; and 750000 for services listed in Annex XIV to Directive 2014/24/EU and Annex XVII to Directive 2014/25/EU, except of services covered by CPV code 79713000-5. (Public Procurement Act (ZJN-3), 2016, Article 21(1))
What are the minimum application thresholds for the procurement type? (Entity: UTILITIES) EUR 50000. Article 21(1)(b): Thresholds for publication is EUR 50000 for goods and services and design contest; EUR 100000 for works; and EUR 1000000 for social and other specific services, with exception of services which are covered by CPV code 79713000-5 (Public Procurement Act (ZJN-3), 2016, Article 21(1))
What are the minimum application thresholds for the procurement type? (Entity: DEFENCE) EUR 40000. Article 7(2): Thresholds for publication is EUR 40000 for goods and services and EUR 80000 for works. (Public Procurement for Defence and Security Act, 2012, last amended 2016, Article 7(2))

Threshold - by product type

What are the minimum application thresholds for the procurement type? (Product type GOODS) EUR 20000. Article 12(2): Thresholds for publication is EUR 20000 (public sector) and EUR 40000 (utilities). (Public Procurement Act (ZJN-3), 2016, Article 21)
What are the minimum application thresholds for the procurement type? (Product type WORKS) EUR 40000. Article 12(2): Thresholds for publication say EUR 40000 (public sector) and EUR 80000 (utilities). (Public Procurement Act (ZJN-3), 2016, Article 21)
What are the minimum application thresholds for the procurement type? (Product type SERVICES) EUR 20000. Article 12(2): Thresholds for publication is EUR 20000 (public sector) and EUR 40000 (utilities). (Public Procurement Act (ZJN-3), 2016, Article 21)

Information availability

Publishing and record keeping

Is there a requirement that tender documents must published in full? Yes. CAs shall, by electronic means, offer unrestricted and full direct access free of charge to the procurement documents from the date of publication of a notice in accordance with Article 52 or the date on which an invitation to confirm interest was sent to candidates. (Public Procurement Act (ZJN-3), 2016, Article 52, Article 61)
Are any of these documents published online at a central place? Yes. All of these document are available at the central website (http://www.enarocanje.si/).Article 2(1-28) defines: "public procurement portal" shall mean the information portal of the ministry responsible for public procurement, managed by Public Company Official Gazzete (Javno podjetje Uradni list RS Ltd.) where Cas publish directly information notices, procurement documents and other documents required to be published on the public procurement portal under the PP Act. (Public Procurement Act (ZJN-3), 2016, Article 2(1)28, Article 52(2))
Is it mandatory to keep all of these records? -Public notices of bidding opportunities, -Bidding documents and addenda, -Bid opening records, -Bid evaluation reports, -Formal appeals by bidders and outcomes, -Final signed contract documents and addenda and amendments, -Claims and dispute resolutions, -Final payments, -Disbursement data (as required by the country’s financial management system) Yes. It is mandatory to keep all documentation on public procurement procedure for a period of at least five years from the date of the issue of the contract decision or for a period of at least two years from the expiry of the contract. (Public Procurement Act (ZJN-3), 2016, Article 105(3))
Are contracts awarded within a framework agreement published (ie mini contracts)? Yes. Yes, quarterly. Article 58(3) defines: If a CA has concluded a framework agreement , it shall not be bound to send a contract award notice for each contract within that agreement, but it shall group notices of the results of the procurement procedure for contracts based on the framework agreement under one contract notice on a quarterly basis and shall send this notice for publication within 30 days of the end of each quarter. (Public Procurement Act (ZJN-3), 2016, Article 58(3))

Sub-contracting

Is it mandatory to publish information on subcontractors (ie names) in some cases? No. Publishing information on subcontracting is optional. Article 105(1)č defines: č) the name of the successful tenderer and the reasons why its tender was selected and, where known, the share of the contract or framework agreement which the successful tenderer intends to subcontract to third parties and, where known at this point in time, the names of the main contractor’s subcontractors, if any. (Public Procurement Act (ZJN-3), 2016, Article 105(1)č)
If yes, what is the threshold for publication (i.e. the % of total contract value subcontracted)? For example, if the threshold is 75%, and you have subcontracted out only 40% of your contract, no disclosure is required. Consultant will insert 75% in the short answer column. It is not mandatory to publish information on subcontractors so there is no threshold.

Evaluation

Preferential treatment

Is there a ban on mentioning specific companies or brands in tender specification/call for tender? Yes. Article 68(6) defines: Unless justified by the subject-matter of the contract, technical specifications shall not refer to a specific make or source or to a particular process which characterises the products or services provided by a specific economic operator or to trade marks, patents, types or a specific origin or production with the effect of favouring or eliminating certain undertakings or certain products. Such reference shall be permitted on an exceptional basis where a sufficiently precise and intelligible description of the subject-matter of the contract pursuant to the preceding paragraph is not possible. Such reference shall also be accompanied by the words “or equivalent”. (Public Procurement Act (ZJN-3), 2016, Article 68(6))
Is there a preferential treatment for small-to-medium enterprises (SMEs)? No. The principle of equal treatment of tenderers applies. (Public Procurement Act (ZJN-3), 2016, Article 7)
Is there a preferential treatment for local/national companies? (companies from other EU MS are considered foreign companies) No. The principle of equal treatment of tenderers applies. (Public Procurement Act (ZJN-3), 2016, Article 7)
Is there a specific set of rules for green/sustainable procurement? Yes. For public works contracts and public services contracts, and only in appropriate cases, an indication of the environmental management measures that the economic operator will be able to apply when performing the contract. There is a National Action Plan on including GPP criteria, and a government decree setting minimum requirements for purchasing certain products. (Public Procurement Act (ZJN-3), 2016, Article 84, Article 85; Decree on green public procurement )

Bid evaluation

Are there restrictions on allowable grounds for tenderer exclusion? Yes. CAs shall exclude an economic operator from participation in a procurement procedure if that economic operator or its authorised representatives has been: (1) the subject of a conviction by a final judgment containing elements of the following criminal offences defined in the Criminal Code (exhaustevly list of nearly 50 criminal offences), (2) has not complied with its obligations relating to the payment of compulsory charges or other pecuniary non-tax liabilities under the law governing financial administration. CAs shall exclude an economic operator from a procurement procedure in also any of the following situations: a) if the economic operator is excluded from contract award procedures on the date of the expiry of the time limit for the submission of tenders or requests due to its inclusion in the register of economic operators with negative references; b) if, in the three years preceding the expiry of the time limit for the submission of tenders, the economic operator was fined twice, by way of a final decision of the competent authority of the Republic of Slovenia or another Member State or a third country, for a minor offence relating to remuneration for work. (Public Procurement Act (ZJN-3), 2016, Article 75(1)(2)(4))
Are some bids automatically excluded? e.g., lowest/highest price; unusually low price, etc. No. If the contracting authority considers a tender for a given contract to be abnormally low or it is doubtful that the contract could be executed given the supplies, works or services concerned, it shall, before rejecting such a tender, request in writing the details of the predetermined constituent elements of the tender which it considers relevant to the execution of the contract or to the classification of tenders. E.g. economics of construction method or state aid etc. But exclusion is only an option, not automatic. (Public Procurement Act (ZJN-3), 2016, Article 86)
Is scoring criteria published? Yes. Article 84(7) defines: In the procurement documents, the contracting authority shall specify the relative weighting which it gives to each of the criteria chosen to determine the most economically advantageous tender, except where such a tender is identified on the basis of price alone. These weightings may be expressed by providing for a range with an appropriate maximum spread. Where weighting is not possible for objective reasons, the contracting authority shall indicate the criteria in descending order of importance. criteria in descending order of importance. (Public Procurement Act (ZJN-3), 2016, Article 84(7))
Are decisions always made by a committee? No. CAs may appoint an expert committee to conduct the procurement procedure or a part thereof. However, only the authorised represectative of the CA is authorised to make the decision. (Public Procurement Act (ZJN-3), 2016, Article 66(2))
Are there regulations on evaluation committee composition to prevent conflict of interest? No. However, persons responsible for public procurement and civil servants of the National Review Commission have obligation to declare assets to the Commission for the Prevention of the Corruption once a year. The law is also ensuring the transparency of lobbying to promote good practices and restrict and sanction unethical lobbying practices. (Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act, 2011, especially Article 4(1)11, Article 41(1) and 41(3))
Is some part of evaluation committee mandatorily independent of contracting authority? No. In practice there are usually civil servants of the CA members of the Technical Commission. Although it is not prohibited for the external (independent) experts to be a member of the Tecnical Commission, this is very rare.
Are scoring results publicly available? Yes. Not later than 30 days after the conclusion of a contract or a framework agreement, following the decision to award or conclude it, contracting authorities shall send for publication a contract award notice on the results of the procurement procedure. (Public Procurement Act (ZJN-3), 2016, Article 58(1))
Does the law specify under which conditions the tender can be cancelled? Yes. The contracting authority can suspend the public procurement procedure at any time of the procedure. The decision must be published, if the procedure was published. The CA may also reject all tenders, subject to certain conditions. (Public Procurement Act (ZJN-3), 2016, Article 90(1)(5))

Open competition

CFT publication

Does the law specify the location for publicizing open calls for tenders? Yes. All of these document are available at the central website (http://www.enarocanje.si/).Article 2(1-28) defines: "public procurement portal" shall mean the information portal of the ministry responsible for public procurement, managed by Public Company Official Gazzete (Javno podjetje Uradni list RS Ltd.) where Cas publish directly information notices, procurement documents and other documents required to be published on the public procurement portal under the PP Act. (Public Procurement Act (ZJN-3), 2016, Article 2(1)28, Article 52)
Does the law specify the location for publicizing restricted calls for tenders? Yes. All of these document are available at the central website (http://www.enarocanje.si/).Article 2(1-28) defines: "public procurement portal" shall mean the information portal of the ministry responsible for public procurement, managed by Public Company Official Gazzete (Javno podjetje Uradni list RS Ltd.) where Cas publish directly information notices, procurement documents and other documents required to be published on the public procurement portal under the PP Act. (Public Procurement Act (ZJN-3), 2016, Article 2(1)28, Article 52)
Does the law specify the location for publicizing negotiated calls for tenders? Yes. All of these document are available at the central website (http://www.enarocanje.si/).Article 2(1-28) defines: "public procurement portal" shall mean the information portal of the ministry responsible for public procurement, managed by Public Company Official Gazzete (Javno podjetje Uradni list RS Ltd.) where Cas publish directly information notices, procurement documents and other documents required to be published on the public procurement portal under the PP Act. (Public Procurement Act (ZJN-3), 2016, Article 2(1)28, Article 52)

Minimum # of bidders

What is the minimum number of bidders for restricted procedures? 5. (Public Procurement Act (ZJN-3), 2016, Article 82(3))
What is the minimum number of bidders for negotiated procedures? 3. (Public Procurement Act (ZJN-3), 2016, Article 82(3))
What is the minimum number of bidders for competitive dialogue procedures? 3. (Public Procurement Act (ZJN-3), 2016, Article 82(3))

Bidding period length

What are the minimum number of days for open procedures? 35. However, it can be shortened up to 15 days in case of a prior information notice was published. Also, the CA may reduce by five days the time limit for the receipt of tenders (i.e. 35 days) where tenders may be submitted by electronic means. (Public Procurement Act (ZJN-3), 2016, Article 40(2)(3))
What are the minimum number of days for restricted procedures? 30. The minimum time limits are: 1. for receipt of requests to participate: 30 days from the date on which the contract notice is sent; 2. for receipt of tenders under restricted procedure: 30 days from the date on which the invitation is sent. However, when the CA has published a prior information notice, the time limit for the receipt of tenders may be shortened, but not to less than 10 days. Also, the CA may reduce by five days the time limit for the receipt of tenders (i.e. 30 days) where tenders may be submitted by electronic means. (Public Procurement Act (ZJN-3), 2016, Article 41(2)(5)(7))
What are the minimum number of days  for competitive negotiated procedures? 30. However, it may be shortened to 10 days, provided that the following conditions are fulfilled: (1) all the information required for the contract notice was available at the time of the publication and was included in the prior information notice; and (2) the prior information notice was sent for publication between 35 days and 12 months before the date on which the contract notice was sent for publication. Also, the CA may reduce by five days the time limit for the receipt of tenders (i.e. 30 days) where tenders may be submitted by electronic means. (Public Procurement Act (ZJN-3), 2016, Article 44(4)(5)(6))

Institutional arrangements

Institutions and regulations

Does the law specify the main EXCEPTIONS preventing the application of the public procurement law for tenders/organisations? Yes. 1) Contracting authorities in the field of telecommunication in certain cases, 2) other public procurement rules, 3) International agreement/International organization, 4) certain public service contracts (acquisition or rental of land, legal stated services ...), 5) Public service contract with an association with exclusive rights, 6) R&D, 7) contracts awarded a CA which provides postal services, 8) Natural disasters, 9) certain public contracts for purposes of resale or lease to third parties; 10) certain public contracts in the infrastructure field for third countries; 11) certain public contracts for the purchase of water; 12) certain public contracts in the energy sector; 13) in-house (Public Procurement Act (ZJN-3), 2016, Article 27)
Does the law specify the main types of institutions that must apply the public procurement law? Yes. This are: a) authorities of the Republic of Slovenia; b) authorities of self-governing local communities; c) other bodies governed by public law; d) public undertakings which pursue one or more activities in the field of infrastructure; e) other entities pursuing one or more activities in the field of infrastructure, operating on the basis of special or exclusive rights granted by a competent authority of the Republic of Slovenia. (Public Procurement Act (ZJN-3), 2016, Article 9)
Does the law specify the main procedure types or procurement methods permitted? Yes. a) an open procedure; b) a restricted procedure; c) a competitive dialogue; č) an innovation partnership; d) a competitive procedure with negotiation; e) a negotiated procedure with publication; f) a negotiated procedure without prior publication; g) a low-value contract procedure (Public Procurement Act (ZJN-3), 2016, Article 39(1))
Is there a procurement arbitration court dedicated to public procurement cases? Yes. National Review Commission, however there is no right to appeal the decisins before court. (Legal Protection in Public Procurement Procedures Act 2011, last amended 2014)
Is there a procurement regulatory body dedicated to public procurement? No. Public procurement related tasks are under the Ministry of Public Administration and Ministry of Finance. (Public Procurement Act, 2006, amended 2014, for example (non-exhaustive list) Articles 106, 107, 108, 113, 115.)
Does the law specify procurement advisors' profession (i.e. degree to be obtained, official list of members of the professional association) and its role in the tendering process (e.g. right to draft tender documentations, conduct market research identifying bidders)? No.
Is disclosure of final, beneficial owners required for placing a bid? No.

Complaints

Is there a fee for arbitration procedure? Yes. The fees for the procedure before the Nationa Review Commission, when the subject of the appeal is oublication, invitation or tender documentation, are: 1) EUR 1500 for low-value contracts, 2) EUR 2500 for for tender collection procedures, 3) EUR 3.500 in cases of procuring goods and services in open procedure, restricted procedure, negotiation procedure with or without prior publication, competitive dialogue; 4) EUR 7.000 EUR 3.500 in cases of procuring goods and services in open procedure, restricted procedure, negotiation procedure with or without prior publication, competitive dialogue. In all other cases (i.e. in cases of awarded contracts) the fees is 2 % of the contract value, calculating from the most advantageous offer, however not less than EUR 500 or more than EUR 25000. (Act on Legal Protection in Public Procurement Procedures, 2011, last amended 2014, Article 71(1) and 71(2))
Is there a ban on contract signature until arbitration court decision (first instance court)? No. Regardless of the submitted review claim, the contracting authority may continue the public contract award procedure, but it may not conclude the contract, stop the public procurement procedure, reject all tenders or start a new public procurement procedure for the same procurement object unless in specific stated cases. (Legal Protection in Public Procurement Procedures Act 2011, last amended 2014, Articles 17, 19, 20)
What is the maximum number of days until arbitration court decision from filing a complaint in the case of awarded contracts? 15. The Senate or an individual member of the National Review Commission must decide on a review claim and issue a ruling within 15 days from the receipt of the review claim and the entire documentation at the latest, in justified cases it can prolong the perion for additional 15 days, but it must inform the parties involved. (Rules of procedure of the National Review Commission, Article 37(1))
Is there a requirement to publicly release arbitration court decisions ? Yes. Decisions of the National Review Commission shall be published in full text. http://www.dkom.si/odlocitve_DKOM/ (Rules of procedure of the National Review Commission, Article 37(2).)

Qualitative data for 2017


Legislation

Public Procurement Act, 2006, amended 2014 (Slovenian)pdf
Public Procurement Act, 2016 (Slovenian)pdf
Public Procurement Utilities Act 2006, amended 2014 (Slovenian)pdf
Public Procurement in Defence Act 2012 amended 2014 (Slovenian)pdf
Public Procurement in Defence Act 2012 amended 2016 (Slovenian)pdf
Act on Legal Protection in Public Procurement Procedures, 2011, amended 2013 (Slovenian)pdf
Rules of procedure of the National Review Commission 2005 (Slovenian)pdf
Decree on Contracting Authority Information in Public Notifications 2007 amended 2014 (Slovenian)pdf
Decree on Green Procurement 2011 amended 2014 (Slovenian)pdf
Integrity and Prevention of Corruption Act 2011 (Slovenian)pdf